2004: Strange Animal Deaths in Chile

SOURCE: La Estrella del Loa (Calama)
DATE: March 10, 2004

Strange Animal Deaths

A new series of animal slayings occurred in Tocopila, reviving old fears about the existence of a pitiless creature that attacks without leaving a trace or explanation as to how the deaths occur. Yesterday, in the “Tres Marias” sector of the town, located to the north of the port area, the Chupacabra legend was resurrected at the smallholding of Eduardo Covarrubias, where 32 farm birds were found dead. Their bodies were scattered inside the henhouse, which showed no signs of foreced entry by trespassers or other animals from the region. Covarrubias made the macabre find when he went to feed his animals as he did every day, coming across the unpleasant scene of his lifeless hens.

English: Picture of chupacabra.
English: Picture of chupacabra. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The police was immediately informed. Alarmed by the violent animal slayings, law enforcement reached the site swiftly, witnessing the events on the ground. Carabineros (Chilean state police) cordoned off the area to avoid losing evidence while bloodhounds aided in collecting the first hints that would explain this strange event. However, area residents blame the legendary Chupacabras, who has returned to trouble their nightmares, a belief substantiated by the manner in which the deaths occurred.

It was possible to ascertain that the birds showed a single orifice on the base of their necks, having almost the same depth throughout their bodies. Furthermore, it was not possible to find vast quantities of blood on the ground despite the magnitude of the killings. Added to this was the death of the only two roosters, who were beheaded during the attack.

Covarrubias was shaken by the attack, which represented an economic blow in excess of 300,000 Chilean pesos. Research personnel conducted a thorough investigation at the site, taking some of the dead hens with them for more detailed tests.

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Translation (c) 2004 Scott Corrales IHU
Special thanks to Liliana Nunez

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