Exploring American Monsters: Wisconsin

 Jason Offutt Wisconsin, America’s Dairyland, is a state in the Upper Midwest bordered by Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, and two of the Great Lakes, Superior and Michigan. It’s called America’s Dairyland for a reason. The state of Wisconsin produces more than 13.5 billion kilograms of milk per year, which is equivalent to the milk production of the United Kingdom. It also produces cheese, lots and lots…

Exploring American Monsters: West Virginia

 Jason OffuttWest Virginia has always been a rebel. During the American Civil War, fifty counties of the Confederate state Virginia split off to form their own state West Virginia. This was the only state admitted to the Union during the war, and is the only state to have separated from a Confederate state. The Appalachian Mountains make up two-thirds of West Virginia, covering most of its 24,230 square miles in…

Exploring American Monsters: Washington

 Jason Offutt Washington state, the most northwest of the contiguous United States, is bordered to the north by Canada, the south by Oregon, and the east by Idaho. It is the eighteenth largest of the United States, and has the thirteenth largest population, although most of that population lives in and around the city of Seattle. The geography of Washington is diverse; there are lowlands, fjords, rivers, glaciers, and mountains…

Exploring American Monsters: Virginia

 Jason Offutt The commonwealth of Virginia began in 1607 as the Colony of Virginia, the first permanent British settlement in the New World. It was also one of the original thirteen colonies to declare its independence from England. Virginia’s General Assembly is the oldest law-making group in the New World. Virginia was also the capital of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. Virginia and Maryland donated…

Exploring American Monsters: Vermont

 Jason Offutt Vermont is small. At 9,616 square miles the entire state could be dropped into Africa’s Lake Victoria. Not many people live there, either. According to U.S. Census data, Vermont is the second least populous state (behind Wyoming) with 626,042 residents. It is bordered by New York, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and the Canadian province of Quebec. There are mountains in Vermont, along with forests. What Vermont lacks in human…

Exploring American Monsters: Utah

 Jason Offutt Utah, the Crossroads of the West, became the forty-fifth of the United States in 1896. At 84,916 square miles, Utah is the thirteenth largest state, but has one of the least dense populations. Early settlers to Utah include mountain men, adventurers, scientists, and Mormons persecuted for their religion. The headquarters of the Mormon Church, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, is in Salt Lake City. The…

Exploring American Monsters: Texas

 Jason Offutt Texas is the second largest state in the U.S. It’s big. Really big. Texas’ one-time tourism slogan, “Texas – It’s Like A Whole Other Country,” is apt. At 268,580 square miles, the state is slightly bigger (and more polite) than the entire country of France. It boasts four city areas (Dallas-Fort Worth counts as one) that rank in the top ten most populous cities in America. There are…

Exploring American Monsters: Tennessee

 Jason Offutt The southeastern state of Tennessee is the birthplace of bluegrass music, Mountain Dew soda, miniature golf, the tow truck, and Jack Daniels Whiskey. It’s tied with Missouri as the state that borders the most other states (eight). It’s also the 36th largest state, but the 17th most populous. Famous Tennesseans include singers Johnny Cash, Aretha Franklin and Tina Turner, actor Morgan Freeman, director Quentin Tarantino, former vice president…

The Strangest Story Ever Told?

In Alaska there is a Bay known as Thomas Bay and all though this Bay is very remote it has seen a lot of tragedy and it is also called the bay of death. In 1750 a native village was hit by a massive landslide and more than 500 people died. Then in the very late 19th century a ship carrying Chinese immigrants hired to work for an Alaskan salmon…

Exploring American Monsters: Washington

Washington state, the most northwest of the contiguous United States, is bordered to the north by Canada, the south by Oregon, and the east by Idaho. It is the eighteenth largest of the United States, and has the thirteenth largest population, although most of that population lives in and around the city of Seattle. The geography of Washington is diverse; there are lowlands, fjords, rivers, glaciers, and mountains (which include…

Truly Strange Cases of People Kidnapped by Bigfoot

“I was kidnapped by Bigfoot.” It is an absurd statement that seems practically synonymous with bad tabloid headlines, cranks, and kooks. Yet in the pantheon of the countless Bigfoot and hairy hominid reports that have come in from all corners of the globe there can be found a surprisingly high number of accounts that indeed claim exactly this. It is a phenomenon that can almost be considered its own subspecies…

These Early Reports of Sasquatch in Cascadia Offer Eerie Details of “Men Stealers”

Sasquatch, or “Bigfoot” as it is more commonly known today, is as elusive a mystery as any afforded us in North America. While the creature’s alleged existence in popular media really only sprang into the public consciousness during the 1950s, plenty of earlier stories exist, which dealt with “giants” in the mountains of Washington State and other remote regions of Cascadia. One early report that goes as far back as…

Exploring American Monsters: South Carolina

South Carolina, one of the original thirteen British colonies, was the first to ratify the original U.S. Constitution (the Articles of Confederation) in 1781, and was the first state to vote to leave the United States during the Civil War in 1860 (don’t worry, it came back). South Carolina is known for many other firsts for the U.S.: the first round of golf in the New World was played in…