Universal Time May Not Be Universal At All

Here you sit, reading this article, when suddenly you hear a jet engine from an overhead plane. Aboard this plane, someone else is reading this article. Curiously, you two are not reading it in a relevant time frame. Time is actually moving at a different speed for you on the ground than it is for the person on the plane. It’s not much of a difference, just a few fractions of a second, but it is a difference. This phenomena is explained among Einstein’s theories of relativity. In it, he says “the passage of time on the fast-moving object is slower than if the object was at rest.” This is why it is scientifically theorized that if you fell into a black hole, all of time would pass before your eyes – the birth and death of the universe. At the black hole’s event horizon, or point of no […] Read More

1998: THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE ATOMIC BOMB: WHY HIROSHIMA WAS DESTROYED

The Untold Story by Eustace Mullins by Eustace C. Mullins June 1998 The world was stunned to learn that India has now tested nuclear weapons. For many years, all nations have been concerned about the proliferation of atomic explosives. Even in their distress, no one seems to be interested in the historic or the psychological record of why these weapons were developed, and what special breed of mankind devoted themselves to this diabolical goal. Despite the lack of public interest, the record is clear, and easily available to anyone who is interested. My interest in this subject, dormant for many years was suddenly rekindled during my annual lecture tour in Japan. My hosts had taken me to the city of Nagasaki for the first time. Without telling me their plans, they entered the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum. I thought it would be an interesting experience, but, to my surprise, when I […] Read More

1994: Beyond E=mc2

A first glimpse of a postmodern physics, in which mass, inertia and gravity arise from underlying electromagnetic processes Bernard Haisch, Alfonso Rueda & H.E. Puthoff published in THE SCIENCES, Vol. 34, No. 6, November / December 1994, pp. 26-31 copyright 1994, New York Academy of Sciences (posted with permission) The most famous of all equations must surely be E=mc2. In popular culture that relation between energy and mass is virtually synonymous with relativity, and Einstein, its originator, has become a symbol of modern physics. The usual interpretation of the equation is that one kind of fundamental physical thing, mass (m in the equation), can be converted into a quite different kind of fundamental physical thing, energy (E in the equation), and vice versa; the two quantities are inextricably intertwined, related by the factor c2, the square of the velocity of light. The energy of the sun, for instance, comes […] Read More