Universal Time May Not Be Universal At All

Here you sit, reading this article, when suddenly you hear a jet engine from an overhead plane. Aboard this plane, someone else is reading this article. Curiously, you two are not reading it in a relevant time frame. Time is actually moving at a different speed for you on the ground than it is for the person on the plane. It’s not much of a difference, just a few fractions of a second, but it is a difference. This phenomena is explained among Einstein’s theories of relativity. In it, he says “the passage of time on the fast-moving object is slower than if the object was at rest.” This is why it is scientifically theorized that if you fell into a black hole, all of time would pass before your eyes – the birth and death of the universe. At the black hole’s event horizon, or point of no […] Read More

Quantum fluctuations of empty space: A new Rosetta Stone in physics?

by Dr Harold Puthoff Institute for Advanced Studies, 1301 Capital Of Texas Highway S., Suite B 121 Austin, Texas 78746 (512) 328-5751 In a recent article in the popular press (The Economist, January 7, 1989, pp. 71-74) it was noted how many of this century’s new technologies depend on the Alice-in-Wonderland physics of quantum mechanics, with all of its seeming absurdities. For starters, one begins with the observation that classical physics tells us that atoms, which can be likened to a miniature solar system with electron planets orbiting a nuclear sun, should not exist. The circling electrons should radiate away their energy like microscopic radio antennas and spiral into the nucleus. But atoms do exist, and multitudinous other phenomena which don’t obey the rules do occur. To resolve this cognitive dissonance physicists introduced quantum mechanics, which is essentially a set of mathematical rules to describe what in fact does […] Read More

1994:QUANTUM STRANGENESS AND SPACETIME

By Sherrill Roberts There was a young lady named bright, Who traveled much faster than light. She started one day in a relative way, and returned on the previous night. A. H. Reginald Buller(1) While we are no longer so naive as to think that a mechanical device such as H.G. Wells’s Time Machine could be easily built, the “new physics” offers us tantalizing glimpses of the possibility of time travel, possibly utilizing forces and entities which exist, at least theoretically, in our universe today. “The notion you can move forward and back in time is allowed by some of the new ideas in physics,” says Jeffrey R. Kuhn, a physics and astronomy professor at Michigan State University.(2) The scientific premises suggesting a theoretical time travel mechanism are Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and its successor, quantum mechanics. Einstein’s inclusion of time as simply another basic dimension of physical reality, […] Read More

1998: THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE ATOMIC BOMB: WHY HIROSHIMA WAS DESTROYED

The Untold Story by Eustace Mullins by Eustace C. Mullins June 1998 The world was stunned to learn that India has now tested nuclear weapons. For many years, all nations have been concerned about the proliferation of atomic explosives. Even in their distress, no one seems to be interested in the historic or the psychological record of why these weapons were developed, and what special breed of mankind devoted themselves to this diabolical goal. Despite the lack of public interest, the record is clear, and easily available to anyone who is interested. My interest in this subject, dormant for many years was suddenly rekindled during my annual lecture tour in Japan. My hosts had taken me to the city of Nagasaki for the first time. Without telling me their plans, they entered the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum. I thought it would be an interesting experience, but, to my surprise, when I […] Read More

1994: Beyond E=mc2

A first glimpse of a postmodern physics, in which mass, inertia and gravity arise from underlying electromagnetic processes Bernard Haisch, Alfonso Rueda & H.E. Puthoff published in THE SCIENCES, Vol. 34, No. 6, November / December 1994, pp. 26-31 copyright 1994, New York Academy of Sciences (posted with permission) The most famous of all equations must surely be E=mc2. In popular culture that relation between energy and mass is virtually synonymous with relativity, and Einstein, its originator, has become a symbol of modern physics. The usual interpretation of the equation is that one kind of fundamental physical thing, mass (m in the equation), can be converted into a quite different kind of fundamental physical thing, energy (E in the equation), and vice versa; the two quantities are inextricably intertwined, related by the factor c2, the square of the velocity of light. The energy of the sun, for instance, comes […] Read More

Music and the Brain

Laurence O’Donnell “Music is so naturally united with us that we cannot be free from it even if we so desired” (Boethius cited by Storr). Music’s interconnection with society can be seen throughout history. Every known culture on the earth has music. Music seems to be one of the basic actions of humans. However, early music was not handed down from generation to generation or recorded. Hence, there is no official record of “prehistoric” music. Even so, there is evidence of prehistoric music from the findings of flutes carved from bones. The influence of music on society can be clearly seen from modern history. Music helped Thomas Jefferson write the Declaration of Independence. When he could not figure out the right wording for a certain part, he would play his violin to help him. The music helped him get the words from his brain onto the paper. Albert Einstein […] Read More

Traveling Through Time

What is time? Is time travel possible? For centuries, these questions have intrigued mystics, philosophers, and scientists. Much of ancient Greek philosophy was concerned with understanding the concept of eternity, and the subject of time is central to all the world’s religions and cultures. Can the flow of time be stopped? Certainly some mystics thought so. Angelus Silesius, a sixth-century philosopher and poet, thought the flow of time could be suspended by mental powers: Time is of your own making; its clock ticks in your head. The moment you stop thought time too stops dead. The line between science and mysticism sometimes grows thin. Today physicists would agree that time is one of the strangest properties of our universe. In fact, there is a story circulating among scientists of an immigrant to America who has lost his watch. He walks up to a man on a New York street […] Read More

Parallel universes, the Matrix, and superintelligence

June 26, 2003 by Michio Kaku Physicists are converging on a “theory of everything,” probing the 11th dimension, developing computers for the next generation of robots, and speculating about civilizations millions of years ahead of ours, says Dr. Michio Kaku, author of the best-sellers Hyperspace and Visions and co-founder of String Field Theory, in this interview by KurzweilAI.net Editor Amara D. Angelica. Published on KurzweilAI.net June 26, 2003. What are the burning issues for you currently? Well, several things. Professionally, I work on something called Superstring theory, or now called M-theory, and the goal is to find an equation, perhaps no more than one inch long, which will allow us to “read the mind of God,” as Einstein used to say. In other words, we want a single theory that gives us an elegant, beautiful representation of the forces that govern the Universe. Now, after two thousand years of […] Read More

BEYOND E=mc2

A first glimpse of a postmodern physics, in which mass, inertia and gravity arise from underlying electromagnetic processes Bernard Haisch, Alfonso Rueda & H.E. Puthoff published in THE SCIENCES, Vol. 34, No. 6, November / December 1994, pp. 26-31 copyright 1994, New York Academy of Sciences (posted with permission)   The most famous of all equations must surely be E=mc2. In popular culture that relation between energy and mass is virtually synonymous with relativity, and Einstein, its originator, has become a symbol of modern physics. The usual interpretation of the equation is that one kind of fundamental physical thing, mass (m in the equation), can be converted into a quite different kind of fundamental physical thing, energy (E in the equation), and vice versa; the two quantities are inextricably intertwined, related by the factor c2, the square of the velocity of light. The energy of the sun, for instance, […] Read More