Exploring Canadian Monsters: Manitoba

Manitoba has a special place in the world of monsters. The word “cryptid” was first used by Manitoba’s John E. Wall in 1983 to describe animals sought by cryptozoologists. The province of Manitoba stretches from the U.S. border of North Dakota in the south to the territory of Nunavut to the north. It is the eighth largest of Canada’s provinces and territories at 651,036 square kilometers, and boasts prairies, farmland, mountains, lakes, rivers and tundra. With 645 kilometers ofHudson Bay coastline to the northeast, Manitoba is the only Prairie Province (which includes Saskatchewan and Alberta) to have a saltwater border. The province was created in 1869 under much protest when the Métis (an aboriginal people who take their roots from First Nations and Europeans) rebelled against Canada for, among other things, installing an English-speaking governor over a French-speaking one. The nerve. An estimated 1.3 million people live in Manitoba. Famous residents include […] Read More

Exploring Canadian Monsters: New Brunswick

New Brunswick, one of the smallest Canadian provinces at 72,908 square kilometers, is nestled on Canada’s eastern shores between Nova Scotia and Quebec, sitting atop the American state Maine like a pompadour. First Nations peoples have lived in the area since at least 7000 BCE. New Brunswick was also part of Vinland, a section of North America explored by the Vikings around 1000 CE. The province is covered by 15 million acres of forestland, more than 60 rivers, and boasts the Bay of Fundy where tourists flock to watch whales. New Brunswick’s Saint John was the first incorporated city in Canada. Famous people from New Brunswick include two Fathers of Confederation, Peter Mitchell and Samuel Leonard Tilley, founders of Canada’s oldest candy company Gilbert and James Ganong, actors Walter Pidgeon and Donald Sutherland, father of Canadian poetry Sir Charles G. D. Roberts, and Brenda Robertson, the first woman elected to […] Read More