2015: Cometh The Censor

I see with no surprise that Washington is stepping up its campaign to censor the internet. It had to come and will succeed.  It will put paid forever to America’s flirtation with freedom. The country was never really a democracy, meaning a polity in which final power rested with the people. The voters have always been too remote from the levers of power to have much influence. Yet for a brief window of time, there actually was freedom of a sort. With the censorship of the net—it will be called “regulation”—the last hope of retaining former liberty will expire. Over the years freedom has declined in inverse proportion to the reach of the central government. (Robert E. Lee: “I consider the constitutional power of the General Government as the chief source of stability to our political system, whereas the consolidation of the states into one vast republic, sure to […] Read More

2017: The Real Reason Why The UN Wants Control Over The Internet

The following article was written by Patrick Wood and originally published at Technocracy News & Trends. By its very nature, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is a non-profit organization exclusively run by Technocrats. As such, it is an apolitical body that is happy to serve whatever form of governance exists as long as funding is received and salaries are paid. To a Technocrat, a world run by science and technology is better than any other form of governance. That Technocrats have played a supporting role in world history is unquestioned. Scientists, engineers, and technicians played a huge role in the Communist dictatorship in the former Soviet Union (For instance, see Science and the Soviet Social Order). Technocrats likewise played a central role in support of Adolph Hitler and National Socialism (See Scientists, Engineers, and National Socialism). In both cases, the Technocrat goal was not necessarily Communism or Nazism, but […] Read More

2017: Here’s How to Delete Yourself from the Internet – at the Click of a Button

In our smart phone-obsessed digital age, we effectively live our entire lives online, which makes us increasingly vulnerable to unseen threats.  Cybercrime, fraud, and identity theft are exponentially growing concerns. Our personal lives, locations, and increasingly our passwords are made public online for anyone to find. If the highly invasive Investigatory Powers Bill (AKA the Snooper’s Charter) isn’t blocked, then every single digital move you make will be recorded for up to 12 months. Also, infinite junk mails. But erasing your digital trace from the World Wide Web can seem overwhelming, especially since each person has on average 1,000,000,000 preferences, passwords, subscriptions and linked accounts. So how would you go about tracking them all down? In step two Swedish developers, with the easy-assemble, Ikea-style approach.  Wille Dahlbo and Linus Unnebäck have created Deseat.me, which allows you to log in with a Google account, and immediately see which apps and services are linked to it. […] Read More

2015: Internet Is Less Safe, Less Free And Less Private

(The Real Agenda) The world wide web is becoming a police state in itself where users, who have paid for its construction and dissemination, are less safe and less free to navigate. Internet freedom has declined for the fifth consecutive year, and, not surprisingly governments are the parties the bear the bulk of the responsibility for such a decrease as they are the ones imposing restrictions on the rights of Internet users and illegally monitoring their activity. These are some conclusions of the report published by Freedom House, an organisation that analyzed the current state Internet freedom in 65 countries. The study indicates that more and more governments try to censor information that is of general interest and puts pressure on the private sector to remove content they do not approve. Although some of the grossest infringements on Internet freedom are though to be committed in places like China […] Read More

2015: FBI Reveals 11 Attacks Against Internet Lines in California

On Tuesday, someone broke into an underground vault in Sacramento, and cut several high-capacity internet cables. Nobody knows who this person is or why they did it, but since that time the FBI has revealed that it was not an isolated incident. They’ve been investigating 10 other recent attacks on the internet infrastructure of California, and they seem to be deeply troubled by the vulnerability of these cables. The FBI is investigating at least 11 physical attacks on high-capacity Internet cables in California’s San Francisco Bay Area dating back a year, including one early Tuesday morning. Agents confirm the latest attack disrupted Internet service for businesses and residential customers in and around Sacramento, the state’s capital. FBI agents declined to specify how significantly the attack affected customers, citing the ongoing investigation. In Tuesday’s attack, someone broke into an underground vault and cut three fiber-optic cables belonging to Colorado-based service […] Read More

2015: Today’s Net Neutrality Order is a Win, with a Few Blemishes

Today, the FCC published its new order [PDF] on net neutrality.  As promised, the rules start by putting net neutrality on the right legal footing, which means they have a much stronger chance of surviving the inevitable legal challenge.  This is the culmination of years of work by public interest advocates and a massive outpouring of public support over the past year. Make no mistake, this is a win for Team Internet! Now, what about the rules themselves?  We’re still reviewing, but there’s much to appreciate, including bright line rules against blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization of Internet traffic. For example, an ISP cannot degrade customers’ access to services that compete with its own offerings and cannot charge tolls to privilege traffic from one web service over others. We applaud the FCC for listening to Internet users and acting to protect the open Internet from unfair discrimination by mobile […] Read More

2015: Floridians, Help Us Stop Your State From Outlawing Anonymous Websites

Floridians, we need your help to stop a dangerous anti-anonymity bill. This week, the Florida state legislature is considering a bill that would make it illegal to run any website or service anonymously, if the site fits a vague category of “disseminat[ing]” “commercial” recordings or videos—even the site owner’s own work. Outlawing anonymous speech raises a serious First Amendment problem, and laws like this one have been abused by police and the entertainment industry. The bill, which is moving through Florida House and Senate committees this week, requires anyone who operates a website or Internet service to “disclose his or her true and correct name, physical address, and telephone number or e-mail address.” It would apply to any website or service “dealing in substantial part in the electronic dissemination of commercial recordings or audiovisual works, directly or indirectly,” to Florida consumers. A great many websites could be de-anonymized by […] Read More

2015: Net Neutrality Fast Facts

http://ift.tt/1BBXPIu The Federal Communications Commission just approved new rules that allow it to regulate the Internet like a utility, establishing net neutrality. But only for now. The move has some very powerful opponents, starting with the cable and telecom companies  — companies that control most of the Internet infrastructure, seem likely to take the issue to court and have many friends in Congress. In recent days and weeks, the primary opposition in Congress to a move to establish net neutrality was led by Republicans, who do indeed get a lot of support from the big telecoms and cable companies — but it’s by no means a partisan issue. Many Democrats also have close ties to these companies. We’ve compiled some fast facts below on the influence wielded in Washington by the four biggest opponents of net neutrality and just who their friends are: Comcast: Comcast, the cable, Internet and […] Read More