1998?: The End of Death: ‘Soul Catcher’ Computer Chip Due…

By Robert Uhlig The Electronic Telegraph (England) (From CNI News) A computer chip implanted behind the eye that could record a person’s every lifetime thought and sensation is to be developed by British scientists. “This is the end of death,” said Dr. Chris Winter, of British Telecom’s artificial life team. He predicted that within three decades it would be possible to relive other people’s lives by playing back their experiences on a computer. “By combining this information with a record of the person’s genes, we could recreate a person physically, emotionally and spiritually.” Dr. Winter’s team of eight scientists at BT’s Martlesham Heath Laboratories near Ipswich calls the chip the ‘Soul Catcher.’ It would be possible to imbue a new-born baby with a lifetime’s experiences by giving him or her the Soul Catcher chip of a dead person, Dr. Winter said. The proposal to digitize existence is based on […] Read More

2008: Ex-IBM Employee Alleges TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for Chips

An introduction to New Technologies by Patrick Redmond Patrick Redmond graduated with a Doctorate in History from the University of London, England in 1972. He taught at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad, then at Adhadu Bello University in Kano, Nigeria before joining IBM. He worked in IBM for 31 years before retiring. During his career at IBM he held a variety of jobs. These included; from 1992 until 2007 working at the IBM Toronto lab in technical, then in sales support. He has written two books and numerous articles. Here is a presentation he gave in Toronto on April 13, 2008. * * * I want to thank Yvon for inviting me here to talk about new technologies. What I’m going to do is give you an introduction to three technologies that are becoming more and more important. The first is RFID chips, the second genetic […] Read More

2014: Is Convenience Creating Hazards In The Digital Age?

Home automation technology: is it an asset or a liability? Alternately referred to as “The Internet of Things,” such systems allow homeowners to control multiple devices within their house, which communicate with each other via wireless technology. However egalitarian this may sound, it’s worth noting that such systems do pose multiple security risks. Part of what’s alarming about this situation is that Google recently acquired the home automation tech developer Nest. On the one hand, Google has done a tremendous amount to create an experience for internet browsers that weeds out marketing ploys and, ideally speaking, takes users to the sites which are most relevant to their search queries. On the other hand, because so many people use Google, they have comprehensive data about virtually everyone in the developed world, and they’ve also been working, rather pro-actively, towards increasing internet availability in remote corners of the United States, as […] Read More

2014: WhatsApp Works To Achieve Greater User Privacy By Encrypting Messages

More than 500 million people are using the WhatsApp Android application now. the most widely used instant messaging service in the world announced that it has started encrypting messages in order to protect its users from hackers, says Open Whisper Systems, a software development group associated with the company. Last Tuesday, WhatsApp declared that it is out, performing end-to-end encryption, an upgrade to its privacy protections that make it nearly impossible for anyone to read users’ messages—even the company itself, WhatsApp claims it will not be able to decrypt any messages even if it is asked to do so by the authorities. This will be achieved via TextSecure protocol, which scrambles messages with a cryptographic key that only the user can access and never leaves his or her device. That’s why end-to-end encryption is so hard to break. WhatsApp, which became a Facebook subsidiary, will use an encryption system […] Read More

2015: Google, NASA: Our quantum computer is 100 million times faster than normal PC

Two years ago Google and NASA went halfsies on a D-Wave quantum computer, mostly to find out whether there are actually any performance gains to be had when using quantum annealing instead of a conventional computer. Recently, Google and NASA received the latest D-Wave 2X quantum computer, which the company says has “over 1000 qubits.” At an event yesterday at the NASA Ames Research Center, where the D-Wave computer is kept, Google and NASA announced their latest findings – and for highly specialized workloads, quantum annealing does appear to offer a truly sensational performance boost. For an optimization problem involving 945 binary variables, the D-Wave X2 is up to 100 million times faster (108) than the same problem running on a single-core classical (conventional) computer. Google and NASA also compared the D-Wave X2’s quantum annealing against Quantum Monte Carlo, an algorithm that emulates quantum tunneling on a conventional computer. […] Read More