2007: Microsoft-loving (former) security czar calls for closed internet

By Cade Metz in Santa Clara Published Tuesday 2nd October 2007 22:24 GMT Richard Clarke, the man who served President Bush as a special adviser for cybersecurity, has a five-point plan for saving the internet. Speaking at a Santa Clara University conference dedicated to “trust online,” Clarke called the net “a place of chaos in many ways, a place of crime in many ways,” but laid out several means of righting the ship, including biometric IDs, government regulation, and an industry-wide standard for secure software. He even embraces the idea of a closed internet – which seems to have sparked a death threat from net pioneer Vint Cerf. “A lot of these ideas go against the grain. A lot of these ideas are ones people have already objected to – because of certain shibboleths, because of certain belief systems, because of certain ideological differences,” Clarke said. “But if we’re […] Read More

2010: Freedom of speech for the price? Companies and government agencies shut down Web sites

Freedom of speech for the price? Companies and government agencies shut down Web sites s Directory July 23, 2010 ” For the first time in human history, mankind has awakened a political – it’s a whole new reality of -. It is not so for most of human history “- Zbigniew Brzezinski, May 2010 duties of citizenship in the United States began during the colonial period as the active participation of citizens in local politics through frequent public hearings on matters of an issue and the broad participation under the influence in a democracy. various factors and forces changing the ratio of the nation’s history. Today, Sun is essentially the legal status of citizen’s right to live and work the people and enjoy certain rights and privileges provided by law. p In modern society, many still practice the spirit of citizen participation via the Internet through blogs, alternative news […] Read More

2012: How can social networks make money?

With social networks now big business, what can the companies do to turn free services into hard cash? Over the past month, US Facebook users have been enjoying a selection of Warner Bros blockbusters streamed through the site in exchange for about $4 (£2.45) in Facebook credits. Facebook takes a 30% cut of each credit spent, much like Apple and its app store. There are over 400 apps and games where the site’s 500 million users can go on a social spending spree. It is easy to see how money can be made – a valuation last month valued Facebook at around $50bn (£30.6bn)- more than Warner Bros and almost twice that of computer giant Dell. Advertising is at the heart of most internet success stories. But in some ways, social networks are uniquely engineered as money-making machines. “Because you’re creating the content and you’re making up the content […] Read More

2012: US Senators call for universal Internet filtering

US senators today made a bipartisan call for the universal implementation of filtering and monitoring technologies on the Internet in order to protect children at the end of a Senate hearing for which civil liberties groups were not invited. Commerce Committee Chairman Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii) and Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Vice Chairman Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) both argued that Internet was a dangerous place where parents alone will not be able to protect their children. While filtering and monitoring technologies help parents to screen out offensive content and to monitor their child’s online activities, the use of these technologies is far from universal and may not be fool-proof in keeping kids away from adult material,” Sen. Inouye said. In that context, we must evaluate our current efforts to combat child pornography and consider what further measures may be needed to stop the spread of such illegal material […] Read More

2013: A World Without The Internet: What Would It Be Like? How Different Would Your Life Be?

Internet, after all, is not without enemies… The Internet has become the Archimedean point in our daily life. Almost nothing gets done without it nowadays. The more we rely on it, the more it seems impossible to live without it. It is undoubtedly the most reliable machine Man has ever made. However, could this blind dependence of ours in itself be a threat to mankind? Are we investing too much in this new medium that we are risking to lose too much if we ever were to live without it? Why is the Internet so successful? How does it invade all aspects of life? The Internet, as a matter of fact, is the only manmade machine that has an organic structure. The way everything is wired up is unbelievably complex. Seeing that it has this organic structure, it seems to fit the properties of vitalism perfectly, and all aspects of human […] Read More

2013: Internet freedom on decline worldwide as governments tighten grip – report

Authors highlighted greater internet activism as a bright spot among worrying developments. A protest against cybercrime law near the presidential palace in Manila October 13, 2012. (Reuters / Cheryl Ravelo) Improved surveillance, takedown of opposition websites for “illegal content” and paid pro-government commentators are among the increasingly sophisticated tools used by authorities to restrict internet freedom, a new report claims. The 2013 Freedom on the Net report, compiled by non-profit Freedom House, says that 34 out of the 60 countries it surveyed suffered a falloff in internet freedom over the past year. Iran, Cuba, China and Syria were ranked as countries with the greatest restrictions. China, which blocks millions of websites and employs thousands-strong armies of censors, “led the way in expanding an elaborate technological apparatus for system internet censorship, while further increasing offline coercion and arrests to deter freedom of expression online.” Iceland, Estonia and Germany took the […] Read More

2013: Online Anonymity Is Not Only for Trolls and Political Dissidents

David Plotz: People have a misguided belief in it, but, in general, the fact that anonymity is increasingly hard to get—Facebook doesn’t permit it, most commenting on a lot of sites doesn’t permit it—there’s a loss when you don’t have anonymity. Emily Bazelon: Oh god, I am so not with you on this one. There is a loss if you’re, like, a political dissident in Syria. If you are in this country, almost all of the time, there is a net gain for not having anonymous comments. We so err on the side of ‘Oh, free speech, everywhere, everywhere, let people defame each other and not have any accountability for it.’ And I think in free societies, that is generally a big mistake. And yes, you can make small exceptions for people who truly feel at risk, like victims of domestic violence are an example, but most of the […] Read More

2013: WE EXPOSED THE PRIVATE DETAILS OF 6 MILLION USERS – FACEBOOK

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Facebook Inc has inadvertently exposed 6 million users’ phone numbers and email addresses to unauthorized viewers over the past year, the world’s largest social networking company disclosed late Friday. Facebook blamed the data leaks, which began in 2012, on a technical glitch in its massive archive of contact information collected from its 1.1 billion users worldwide. As a result of the glitch, Facebook users who downloaded contact data for their list of friends obtained additional information that they were not supposed to have. Facebook’s security team was alerted to the bug last week and fixed it within 24 hours. But Facebook did not publicly acknowledge the bug until Friday afternoon when it published an “important message” on its blog explaining the issue. A Facebook spokesman said the delay was due to company procedure stipulating that regulators and affected users be notified before making a public […] Read More

2014: 5 Reasons To Question Apple’s Data Security

Submitted by Mike Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog, I’m the furthest thing in the world from a technology or security expert, but what I have learned in recent years is that a dedicated, sophisticated and well funded hacker can pretty much own your data no matter how many precautions you take. Nevertheless, the major technology companies on the planet shouldn’t go out of their way to make this as easy as possible. In the wake of the theft of private images from several prominent celebrities, many people are rightly wondering whether how vulnerable their data is. The answer appears to be “very,” and if you use Apple, the following article from Slate may leave you seething with a sense of anger and betrayal. David Auerbach wrote the following for Slate. Read it and weep: >In the wake of the theft of the private data and photos of dozens of celebrities, there […] Read More