Category:

The Tendrils of the Slenderman

by David Weatherly Originally published in PARANOIA Issue #59 The Slenderman Imagine a tall figure in a black suit.  His face, if there is one, hidden in the shadows, a glimpse of pale, unnatural skin.  He has impossibly long arms that reach out like slim tendrils grasping at those who get too close.  Strangely, it seems that there are more than just two arms and, octopus like; they move constantly making it difficult to even be sure what you’re seeing.  This figure has been seen in school yards, outside of homes and at sites where disasters have occurred.  He is a Continue Reading

Posted On :
Category:

Slenderman & the Suicide Spirit

If there is one constant in every human society in the world, is that teenage years are never easy. That’s what they call it ‘Adolescence’. For teenagers living in Native American reservations though, on top of all the usual growing pains you and I got to experience, there’s the dealing with endemic problems which have nothing to do with hormones on overdrive, or your first awkward dealings with the opposite sex: Poverty, unemployment, deficient schools, domestic violence, alcoholism and substance abuse, etc; but above all, being part of a culture that has always been relegated and/or denigrated by the usurpers of Continue Reading

Posted On :
Category:

Slenderman: The Cannock Chase Controversy

You may have seen the recent publicity given to a story coming out of the U.K. of sightings in and around Britain’s Cannock Chase woods, of something described as looking like the legendary “Slenderman.” It’s a fictional character created in June 2009 by Eric Knudsen (using the alias of “Victor Surge,” at the forum section of the Something Awful website), who took his inspiration from the world of horror fiction. The Slenderman (also spelled as Slender Man) is a creepy creature indeed: tall, thin, with long arms, a blank (faceless, even) expression, and wearing a dark suit, it sounds almost like a nightmarish version of Continue Reading

Posted On :