2006: Hugo Chavez Steps Up for Native Americans and the Poor

Native American journalist Jodi Lee Rave of Lee Enterprise Newspapers was recently lambasted in a letter to the editor to our local daily for having the temerity to laud the donation of funds for heating fuel for the very poor Indian nations of the Northern Plains. The criticism was initiated by the fact that the donor was the Citgo Petroleum Corporation based in Houston, Texas and headed by the President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, the man reviled by many Americans for referring to President George W. Bush on the floor of the United Nations as the “Devil.” How did it happen that the President of Venezuela reached out to help the poor and the indigenous people of the United States? After two major hurricanes devastated the Southern U. S., a group of U. S. Senators sent out a plea to the major oil companies to help low-income families with […] Read More

2006: Three Paws Speaks on Spirit Guides

site no longer there:  http://www.televar.com/~willgo/speaks2/guide.htm You can not select a spirit guide. The guide must select you. That is the way of the spirits. It matters not what your bloodline is or if you were born into the Wolf Clan or The Bear Clan. Nothing will assure you of having the Wolf or the Bear as your spirit guide. Be you Native American or Hawaiian, Irish or Italian, French or English, or plain old Hash, it makes no difference. Your Spirit Guide must select you. For some, their spirit guide makes itself known when they are young. For others not until they reach adulthood. Still, others must search for their guide. For some, their guide will be with them long before they are aware of it. Having said that, I will speak to you from my heart and tell you the story of how I found one of my […] Read More

2007: Speaking out on the theft and abuse of spirituality

by: Shadi Rahimihttp://www.indiancountry.com/content.cfm?id=1096415443SAN FRANCISCO It was a strange sight, at least in East Los Angeles. While walking her dogs recently at Arroyo Seco Park, Marisol Crisostomo-Romo, 26, said she spotted a van with a tipi on it. Into it piled a group of white children clutching bows and arrows. They were members of the five-week-long Camp Shi’ini, ”a Native American-themed summer camp” that is named after ”a Native American word meaning ‘Summer People,”’ according to its Web site. The 60-year-old camp divides children into nine ”tribes” and offers activities ranging from horseback riding (in the tradition of the Navajo, Comanche and Eskimo, its Web site stated) and archery (Mohawk, Seminole and Blackfoot) to fishing (Zuni, Iroquois and Apache). Crisostomo-Romo, who is Pascua Yaqui, immediately wrote the camp a letter and e-mailed 422 people to do the same, beseeching all those ”offended and disgusted by cultural exploitation and mainstream society’s […] Read More

2015: Native American Tribes Declare Sovereignty, Break Away from State of Maine

Augusta, ME (TFC) – Due to Governor Paul LePage launching direct political and environmental attacks against the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy tribes of Maine, leaders of those tribes have recalled their representatives from the state legislature and are asserting their sovereignty from the State of Maine.  “The Maine Indian Land claims Settlement act has failed and we cannot allow ourselves to continue down the path,” Chief Francis said.  “We’re saying it’s a failed social experiment.” In August of 2011, Governor LePage signed an Executive Order recognizing a “special relationship” between the sovereign State of Maine and the sovereign tribes within the State.  In this order, the Governor instructed all State agencies to include a tribal liaison, whose role would be to facilitate communication and direct policy in all areas of State jurisdiction in such a way as to include the voice and interest of native peoples.  The Order instructs that “the […] Read More

2015: School Forces Native American Girl To Remove Medicine Pouch

A Wisconsin middle school student has been banned from wearing a traditional Native American medicine pouch. The 13-year-old Menominee student was forced by her school principal to remove the medicine pouch, which was constructed and filled with traditional symbolic indigenous plants. It all happened back on October 21. That’s when Rosella “Rose” Kaquatosh was pulled from the lunch line at her school for wearing the pouch outside of her clothing. A kitchen employee at the Gresham Middle School was the first to demand that Kaquatosh remove the pouch. “She saw her pouch [and] she started hollering at her, saying ‘take it off!’” Kaquatosh’s grandmother, Karen Gardner, told ICTMN. “[Kaquatosh] felt bullied. She told her it was ceremonial pouch. [She] explained that she needed it to pray. She prays about four times a day. She respects the sacredness of the pouch.” Kaquatosh tried to explain to the paranoid school officials that the tobacco leaf within the […] Read More

2016: After Years of Oppression US to Pay Out Nearly $1 Billion to Native Americans

Albuquerque, NM — In a historic settlement, Native American tribes have been awarded nearly a billion dollars. The U.S. Department of Justice announced this week that a settlement was reached with 645 Native American Tribes for the sum of $940 million dollars. The settlement stems from a 1990 lawsuit, which claimed the U.S. government failed to pay its portion of federal contracts for housing, education, law enforcement and healthcare, as well as a number of other support programs. When the federal government failed to meet its obligations, people on the tribal lands were decimated by suffering, according to tribal leaders. “The federal government’s conduct was not just cruel and wrong, it was illegal,” said Governor Val Panteah Sr. of the Zuni Pueblo. Tribal leaders believe the massive payout to compensate the tribes will assist in combating major issues faced on reservations such as alcoholism, rampant unemployment and almost non-existent […] Read More

2016: Navajo Water Supply is More Horrific Than Flint, But No One Cares Because They’re Native American

The news out of Flint, Michigan brought the issue of contaminated drinking water into sharp focus, as it was revealed that officials at every level—local, state and federal-knew about lead-poisoned water for months but did nothing to address the problem. Under state-run systems like utilities and roads, poorer communities are the last to receive attention from government plagued by inefficiencies and corrupt politicians. Perhaps no group knows this better than Native Americans, who have been victimized by government for centuries. In the western U.S., water contamination has been a way of life for many tribes. The advocacy group Clean Up The Mines! describes the situation in Navajo country, which is far worse than in Flint, Michigan. Since the 1950s, their water has been poisoned by uranium mining to fuel the nuclear industry and the making of atomic bombs for the U.S. military. Coal mining and coal-fired power plants have […] Read More

2016: “Water Is Our Life”: How a Mining Disaster Affected the Navajo Nation

Nearly a year ago, Environmental Protection Agency contractors accidentally released 3 million gallons of acid drainage from a Colorado mine, contaminating local rivers with hazardous metals and turning the waterways yellow. Just downstream, residents of the Navajo Nation continue to face threats to their health and livelihood. Wastewater from the Gold King Mine drains into retention ponds to eliminate contamination before it flows into the Animas River near Silverton, Colorado, August 15, 2015. (Photo: Mark Holm / The New York Times) In the midst of the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan, it is not surprising that the World Health Organization recently released a report documenting that the environment is responsible for almost a quarter of deaths and disease in the world. But this is not news to the Diné (Navajo) people, who believe that all parts of nature — the water, fish, trees and stars — are equal members […] Read More