UK Man Accused of Hacking US Government Wins Battle to Protect Encryption

Lauri Love On Tuesday, hacktivist Lauri Love won his battle against the UK’s National Crime Agency, who was trying to force him to turn over his encryption keys. Love, 31, of Suffolk is currently wanted by the US government for allegedly hacking into agencies including the US Army, NASA, the US Federal Reserve and the Environmental Protection Agency. There are three open extradition requests against him, one to New Jersey, another to the Southern District of New York, and a last to East Virginia. First arrested in 2013 on an arrest warrant from the US Love was not charged in the UK — yet he had computer equipment seized by British police who then released him on bail. After his release, Love filed a lawsuit against the UK government to return his seized electronics (including devices which they were unable to decrypt), and in May 2015, he had most […] Read More

CISA Systemic Domestic Spying

Technology in cyber space is designed to be the instrument of a totality surveillance society. Secretive methods, back doors, observation and collection of data have been in place for decades. CISA is the latest legislation authorization agreement that provides liability exemption for law enforcement and spooks to conduct their systematic assimilation with the codes and functions of technological development for the intended purpose of efficient monitoring of electronic communication. Coercion for compliance from any resisting tech giant will provide the government with the brute force to muscle their way past any remnants of Fourth Amendment Bill of Right protections. The fact that there is so much enthusiasm in Congress to further gut civil liberties comes as no surprise but is frightening that the push back is so weak. Senate overwhelmingly passes historic cybersecurity bill is reported by CNN accordingly, “It took several tries, but on Tuesday the U.S. Senate […] Read More

Hacking for Security, and Getting Paid for It

SAN FRANCISCO — It should come as no surprise that the Internet is riddled with holes. For as long as people have been writing code, they have been making mistakes. And just about as long as they have been making mistakes, criminals, governments, so-called hacktivists and people who wreck things for kicks have been taking advantage. But if 2014 was the year that hackings of everything from federal government computer networks to the computers of Sony Pictures became routine news, 2015 may be the year that companies tried to do something about it. Though not without some rough nudging. Technology companies including Google, Facebook, Dropbox, Microsoft, Yahoo, PayPal and even the electric-car maker Tesla now offer hackers bounties for reporting the flaws they find in the companies’ wares. It is a significant shift from the tech industry’s standard way of responding — or not responding — to hackers who […] Read More

Hello Biometrics: Windows 10 To Add Facial Recognition, Iris Scans And Fingerprint Reader (VIDEO)

By: Nicholas | Tech Swarm – After several years of consumer complaints, Microsoft Windows 10 has been getting a lot of attention as of late for many upgrades slated for their new version of the popular operating system. However, it appears that one feature being added to supposedly consumer-friendly applications is a suite of biometrics called Windows Hello and Windows Passport. It’s all a part of the move toward a full-fledged Smart World where YOU become the password in a matrix of online and real-world activity. Naturally, the fear of identity theft and cyber crime of all stripes has been the sales pitch to accept this new pervasive identity tech. Apple’s Touch ID was introduced in iPhone 5 which employed a fingerprint scanner for phone locking as well as to make purchases in Apple stores. Yet, it didn’t take long for this new ultra-security measure to be hacked. As Melissa […] Read More

The Wolf Is Guarding the Hen House: The Government’s War on Cyberterrorism

“The game is rigged, the network is bugged, the government talks double-speak, the courts are complicit and there’s nothing you can do about it.”—David Kravets, reporting for Wired Nothing you write, say, text, tweet or share via phone or computer is private anymore. As constitutional law professor Garrett Epps points out, “Big Brother is watching….Big Brother may be watching you right now, and you may never know. Since 9/11, our national life has changed forever. Surveillance is the new normal.” This is the reality of the internet-dependent, plugged-in life of most Americans today. A process which started shortly after 9/11 with programs such as Total Information Awareness (the predecessor to the government’s present surveillance programs) has grown into a full-fledged campaign of warrantless surveillance, electronic tracking and data mining, thanks to federal agents who have been given carte blanche access to the vast majority of electronic communications in America. Their methods […] Read More

Obama Won’t Wait for CISPA, Signs Own Orwellian Cybersecurity Executive Order

Cassius Methyl February 15, 2015 (ANTIMEDIA)  The president signed an executive order Saturday after a speech at a ‘Cyber Security Summit’ at Stanford University, while many were distracted with Valentine’s Day. The ever-hated CISPA legislation has stalled in congress thanks to public outcry, but Obama has decided to act on his own. “Executive Order — Promoting Private Sector Cybersecurity Information Sharing” was apparently intended to coerce organizations and corporations to share more info with the government, while promoting the creation of organizations to process data collected for an unspecified end. The executive order specifically talks about the formation of ‘Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations’ (ISAOs), Orwellian corporate and/or government organizations that process massive amounts of data collected from people through every imaginable way. This obviously can’t be good. The tech sector is already voicing its skepticism of the bill, citing government overreach and lack of reforms to the NSA’s […] Read More

The World’s Email Encryption Software Relies on One Guy, Who is Going Broke

Via Julia Angwin at ProPublica: Update, Feb. 5, 2015, 8:10 p.m.: After this article appeared, Werner Koch informed us that last week he was awarded a one-time grant of $60,000 from Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative. Werner told us he only received permission to disclose it after our article published. Meanwhile, since our story was posted, donations flooded Werner’s website donation page and he reached his funding goal of $137,000. In addition, Facebook and the online payment processor Stripe each pledged to donate $50,000 a year to Koch’s project. The man who built the free email encryption software used by whistleblower Edward Snowden, as well as hundreds of thousands of journalists, dissidents and security-minded people around the world, is running out of money to keep his project alive. Werner Koch wrote the software, known as Gnu Privacy Guard, in 1997, and since then has been almost single-handedly keeping it alive […] Read More

These Cybersecurity Experts Still Don’t Think North Korea Hacked Sony

Mario Anzuoni / Reuters Cybersecurity experts looking at the FBI’s explanation for why North Korea was behind the Sony hack say the logic keeps coming up short, as they increasingly question whether someone else could be behind one of the worst hacks in U.S. history. These experts have called into question the timeline of the attack, aspects of the language used, and the capabilities of North Korea’s bandwidth. Some say the FBI was too quick to point the finger without looking further than the most obvious clues in the malware. “For hackers that’s just brilliant. By blaming North Korea, the hackers have a carte blanche really,” said Jeffrey Carr, founder and CEO of Taia Global, a Seattle-based company that provides cybersecurity consultations to government agencies and private companies. “I’m not aware of this ever being done before. They’ve successfully ripped apart a multinational corporation. They successfully got them to […] Read More