The Real Reason Why The UN Wants Control Over The Internet

The following article was written by Patrick Wood and originally published at Technocracy News & Trends. By its very nature, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is a non-profit organization exclusively run by Technocrats. As such, it is an apolitical body that is happy to serve whatever form of governance exists as long as funding is received and salaries are paid. To a Technocrat, a world run by science and technology is better than any other form of governance. That Technocrats have played a supporting role in world history is unquestioned. Scientists, engineers and technicians played a huge role in the Communist dictatorship in the former Soviet Union (For instance, see Science and the Soviet Social Order). Technocrats likewise played a central role in support of Adolph Hitler and National Socialism (See Scientists, Engineers and National Socialism). In both cases, the Technocrat goal was not necessarily Communism or Nazism, but rather […] Read More

WikiLeaks’ ‘Dark Matter’ Dump Shows CIA’s iPhone, MacBook Hacks

CIA documents published by WikiLeaks Thursday reveal hacks used by the agency against Apple cellphones and computers. Dubbed “Dark Matter,” the documents, a new addition to WikiLeaks’ ongoing “Vault 7” dump, detail hacks leveraged against iPhones and MacBooks as far back as 2008. “These documents explain the techniques used by CIA to gain ‘persistence’ on Apple Mac devices, including Macs and iPhones and demonstrate their use of EFI/UEFI and firmware malware,” a WikiLeaks press release says. By targeting the firmware, CIA hackers can remain in control of an infected device even if the target wipes the data and re-installs the operating system. One such tool, known as “Sonic Screwdriver,” is, according to the CIA, a “mechanism for executing code on peripheral devices while a Mac laptop or desktop is booting…” By providing a target with a compromised peripheral device such as an Apple Thunderbolt-to-Ethernet adapter, which stores “Sonic Screwdriver” […] Read More

If You Use Tor Browser, The FBI Just Labeled You a Criminal

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday quietly approved a rule change that would allow a federal magistrate judge to issue a search and seizure warrant for any target using anonymity software like Tor to browse the internet. by Nadia Prupis Absent action by U.S. Congress, the rule change (pdf) will go into effect in December. The FBI would then be able to search computers remotely — even if the bureau doesn’t know where that computer is located — if a user has anonymity software installed on it. The rule changes, which the FBI said were necessary to combat cyber crime, come amid escalating tensions between the intelligence community and technology and privacy advocates, and just a day after the U.S. House of Representatives advanced a bill that would require the government to obtain a probable cause warrant from a judge before seizing data stored with tech companies such as […] Read More

Internet Is Less Safe, Less Free And Less Private

(The Real Agenda) The world wide web is becoming a police state in itself where users, who have paid for its construction and dissemination, are less safe and less free to navigate. Internet freedom has declined for the fifth consecutive year, and, not surprisingly governments are the parties the bear the bulk of the responsibility for such a decrease as they are the ones imposing restrictions on the rights of Internet users and illegally monitoring their activity. These are some conclusions of the report published by Freedom House, an organisation that analyzed the current state Internet freedom in 65 countries. The study indicates that more and more governments try to censor information that is of general interest and puts pressure on the private sector to remove content they do not approve. Although some of the grossest infringements on Internet freedom are though to be committed in places like China […] Read More

Hacktivist Jeremy Hammond kept in solitary confinement without explanation

Jeremy Hammond, who is in prison for hacking servers of the private intelligence company Statfor and leaking its information to WikiLeaks, has been held in solitary confinement for more than six weeks and will stay there pending a prison investigation. Hammond entered a segregated housing unit (SHU) in mid-July based on a disciplinary infraction incurred while serving time at the Federal Correction Institution in Manchester, Kentucky. He was scheduled to spend 45 days there, with his release date expected to be around August 20. In a letter dated August 18, Hammond told his support network that he was still in the SHU and had no insight into how long he will stay there, according to FreeJeremy.net. Hammond, who has yet to be charged for the disciplinary issue, said he was informed by prison officials that he would stay in the SHU “pending SIS investigation,” by an internal prison police […] Read More

Ashley Madison: The Internet’s Greatest COINTEL PRO Honey Pot?

21st Century Wire says… Finally, the real reason why professional hackers have lifted the data of 37 million users from the fashionable ‘infidelity’ website Ashley Madison. Anyone employed by the state who was stupid enough to join this site should by now realize that this whole hacking affair was a staged exercise in mass entrapment, and blackmail. The media are making a big deal about how this hack is somehow a “goldmine” for cyber criminals, but do not dare mention that, besides a public hack, what this kind of information could do in the hands of the deep state via covert agencies like the NSA, the FBI or the CIA, Canada’s CSIS, or overseas spook houses like Britain’s MI5, or Israel’s Mossad. Easy pickings, all in one place. Much has been made of the not-so-bright conclave of 15,000 US gov’t and military personnel with .gov and .mil addresses – […] Read More

FBI Reveals 11 Attacks Against Internet Lines in California

On Tuesday, someone broke into an underground vault in Sacramento, and cut several high-capacity internet cables. Nobody knows who this person is or why they did it, but since that time the FBI has revealed that it was not an isolated incident. They’ve been investigating 10 other recent attacks on the internet infrastructure of California, and they seem to be deeply troubled by the vulnerability of these cables. The FBI is investigating at least 11 physical attacks on high-capacity Internet cables in California’s San Francisco Bay Area dating back a year, including one early Tuesday morning. Agents confirm the latest attack disrupted Internet service for businesses and residential customers in and around Sacramento, the state’s capital. FBI agents declined to specify how significantly the attack affected customers, citing the ongoing investigation. In Tuesday’s attack, someone broke into an underground vault and cut three fiber-optic cables belonging to Colorado-based service […] Read More

Security expert allegedly told FBI he hacked & steered airliner mid-flight

A computer security expert, who was recently detained and questioned by the FBI over his hack-a-plane joke on Twitter, had earlier revealed to the agency that he accessed aircraft control systems on up to 20 occasions, according to a search warrant. The founder of One World Labs, Chris Roberts, was detained for questioning and had his hardware confiscated in April by federal agents after exiting a United flight from Chicago to Syracuse, New York following his tweet suggesting he might attempt to hack into a flight’s entertainment system. The FBI addressed the tweet urgently and with great seriousness because previous encounters with Roberts revealed that he was capable of such activity. In a search warrant application, obtained by APTN National News, Roberts previously claimed to have told agents that during his research he used his skills and equipment to gain access to an in-flight aircraft entertainment console, or the […] Read More

Today’s Net Neutrality Order is a Win, with a Few Blemishes

Today, the FCC published its new order [PDF] on net neutrality.  As promised, the rules start by putting net neutrality on the right legal footing, which means they have a much stronger chance of surviving the inevitable legal challenge.  This is the culmination of years of work by public interest advocates and a massive outpouring of public support over the past year. Make no mistake, this is a win for Team Internet! Now, what about the rules themselves?  We’re still reviewing, but there’s much to appreciate, including bright line rules against blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization of Internet traffic. For example, an ISP cannot degrade customers’ access to services that compete with its own offerings and cannot charge tolls to privilege traffic from one web service over others. We applaud the FCC for listening to Internet users and acting to protect the open Internet from unfair discrimination by mobile […] Read More

Guess Who Wasn’t Invited to the CIA’s Hacker Jamboree?

Apple, that’s who. Or Microsoft, or any of the other vendors whose products US government contractors have successfully exploited according to a recent report in the Intercept. While we’re not surprised that the Intelligence Community is actively attempting to develop new spycraft tools and capabilities—that’s their job—we expect them to follow the administration’s rules of engagement. Those rules require an evaluation under what’s known as the “Vulnerabilities Equities Process.” In the White House’s own words , the process should usually result in disclosing software vulnerabilities to vendors, because “in the majority of cases, responsibly disclosing a newly discovered vulnerability is clearly in the national interest.” Nevertheless, the Intercept article describes an annual CIA conference known as the Trusted Computing Base (TCB) Jamboree 1 at which members of the intelligence community present extensively on software vulnerabilities and exploits to be used in spying operations. At the 2012 TCB Jamboree, presenters […] Read More

Floridians, Help Us Stop Your State From Outlawing Anonymous Websites

  Floridians, we need your help to stop a dangerous anti-anonymity bill. This week, the Florida state legislature is considering a bill that would make it illegal to run any website or service anonymously, if the site fits a vague category of “disseminat[ing]” “commercial” recordings or videos—even the site owner’s own work. Outlawing anonymous speech raises a serious First Amendment problem, and laws like this one have been abused by police and the entertainment industry. The bill, which is moving through Florida House and Senate committees this week, requires anyone who operates a website or Internet service to “disclose his or her true and correct name, physical address, and telephone number or e-mail address.” It would apply to any website or service “dealing in substantial part in the electronic dissemination of commercial recordings or audiovisual works, directly or indirectly,” to Florida consumers. A great many websites could be de-anonymized […] Read More

Net Neutrality Fast Facts

http://ift.tt/1BBXPIu The Federal Communications Commission just approved new rules that allow it to regulate the Internet like a utility, establishing net neutrality. But only for now. The move has some very powerful opponents, starting with the cable and telecom companies  — companies that control most of the Internet infrastructure, seem likely to take the issue to court, and have many friends in Congress. In recent days and weeks the primary opposition in Congress to a move to establish net neutrality was led by Republicans, who do indeed get a lot of support from the big telecoms and cable companies — but it’s by no means a partisan issue. Many Democrats also have close ties to these companies. We’ve compiled some fast facts below on the influence wielded in Washington by the four biggest opponents of net neutrality and just who their friends are: Comcast: Comcast, the cable, Internet and […] Read More