1899: “I’m A Defeated Man. I Wanted To Illuminate The Whole Earth.”

Nikola Tesla was born in Croatia and only came to the US at the age of 28. Even though his English was not perfect, he was fluent in 8 different languages: Serbo-Croatian, English, Czech, German, French, Hungarian, Italian and Latin. Linguists refer to such a person as a “hyper polyglot”, or someone who can speak more than six languages with great proficiency. The following interview dates back to 1899: Tesla: Yes, these are some of my most important discoveries. I’m a defeated man. I have not accomplished the greatest thing I could. Journalist: What is it, Mr. Tesla? Tesla: I wanted to illuminate the whole earth. There is enough electricity to become a second sun. Light would appear around the equator, as a ring around Saturn. I am part of a light, and it is the music. The Light fills my six senses: I see it, hear, feel, smell, […] Read More

2015: Open Source Plans for Modern Tesla Free Energy Generator Released to Public

In a world of problems and solutions, few ideas spur both immediate hope and skepticism as the idea of free energy, and, on the brink of ecological disaster, nothing may be of greater importance to the human race. The story of Nikola Tesla is a remarkable reminder of how our economic, political and media systems create our reality because it shows how human ingenuity can be co-opted, shut-down, taken-over and hushed by powerful people with financial interests at stake. Fortunately, the legacy of Tesla lives on and people are now more interested than ever in his theories about cosmic energy and his patents for energy systems that could offer promise for liberating earth from dependence on fossil fuels. Could it be that his vision has finally come to fruition and has been made available to the public, some 100 years after his patent for a fuel-less electricity generator? “This […] Read More

1999: NIKOLA TESLA — ERASED AT THE SMITHSONIAN

This author and group is unknown the original photos have been lost anybody with more info let us know Revised August 14, 1999 NIKOLA TESLA HIS NAME MARKS AN EPOCH IN ELECTRICAL SCIENCE TESLA EXPERIMENTING WITH ELECTRICITY IN 1899 AND AS A YOUNG MAN IN 1882 In 1882 he made the discovery that changed the world–harnessing the awesome power of Alternating Current. In 1888 he obtained U.S. patents covering an entire system of polyphase AC that remains unchanged in principle today. He promptly sold all of his patents to George Westinghouse, an acquisition that made the Westinghouse Company the giant it is today. Westinghouse and Tesla were consummate friends, but after Westinghouse died in 1913, the company forgot about its chief benefactor and Tesla fell victim to hard times. Tesla died January 7, 1943, alone, and all but forgotten, in a New York hotel room, paid for by a […] Read More

1996: Overhead Power Lines and Electric Fields Can Kill

Perhaps the most dangerous, damaging form of pollution facing Americans every minute of every day is invisible, soundless, and cannot be touched or felt. It is electromagnetic field radiation (EMF) and it is emanating from virtually every single electrical appliance, computer, electric wire, and especially high voltage lines (overhead and buried), which are carrying current. EMF is specifically causing cancer in children and in older adults and may be triggering countless other immune deficiency and psychological diseases and disorders in anyone in close proximity. Make no mistake about it: electric fields are bad news for your health and can be killers. The government of Sweden funded an official, massive study of the effects of electric fields from overhead power lines on 500,000 people over a period of 25 years and found overwhelming evidence that electric fields generated cancer in children at 4 times the normal rate and tripled the […] Read More

2002: Upper Harmonics, A Short Treatise

By Ken Adachi http://educate-yourself.org/be/upperharmonicsexplained22may02.shtml May 22, 2002 The type of electrical waveform that most people are familiar with is the AC sine wave. AC stands for Alternating Current.  Seen on an oscilloscope, it’s the voltage sine waveform that we are most familiar with from physics textbooks; a gradually undulating, sinusoidal wave shape. It’s important to bear in mind that we are usually looking at a voltage waveforms on the oscilloscope, not current waveforms, but nevertheless we can understand the current flow based on what we see in the voltage waveform. Typically, half of the sine wave cycle occurs in the upper positive region of the oscilloscope graph, above the zero lines, and the other half of the cycle completes itself in the lower, negative region of the graph. In the upper positive region of the graph, the current is flowing in one direction only, but the intensity of the current is first gradually increasing and then […] Read More

1920s: Hendershot Magnetic Motor

W. Beaty In the 1920’s Lester Hendershot, in working on a new type of aviation compass, stumbled across a method of generating energy. The “Hendershot magnetic motor” made headlines and attracted such big-name investors as Charles Lindberg. Hendershot ran into political difficulties in promoting his device, attempted to take his business to Mexico, and finally faded into obscurity having taken a “couldn’t refuse” payoff to never work on his device again. Hendershot believed that his device was not “perpetual motion”, but instead was tapping into the earth’s magnetic field and rotation for an energy source. The Hendershot Device is a self-acting oscillator. It consists of a pair of large air-core coils in “basket weave” format, hand-made cylindrical capacitors inside the coils, several high-value capacitors, a couple of standard transformers, and a permanent-magnet “buzzer” as a regulator. The two large coils are tuned to resonate together. The device generated an […] Read More

1915|1940: Two Fascinating Historic Interviews With Nikola Tesla

This article on Tesla was printed in The New York Times, December 8, 1915. It is referenced in the Eastlund patent records (#4,686,605) for the HAARP. NEW YORK TIMES – December 8, 1915: “Nikola Tesla, the inventor, has filed patent applications on the essential parts of a machine the possibilities of which test a layman’s imagination and promise a parallel of Thor’s shooting thunderbolts from the sky to punish those who had angered the gods. Suffice it to say that the invention will go through space with a speed of 300 MILES PER SECOND, a manless ship without propelling engine or wings, sent by electricity to any desired point on the globe on its errand of destruction, if destruction its manipulator wishes to effect.” [that is 18,000 miles per minute which is around our globe in under a minute and a half – or aimed directly through the globe […] Read More

2005: Nikola Tesla – The Forgotten Genius

When I was asked to write about Nikola Tesla, I hardly knew the name. As a child, I remember visiting a local science museum and of being fascinated by something called a “Tesla coil,” a large mushroom-shaped apparatus that made sparks and lightning. I assumed that Tesla was some kind of inventor but I wasn’t sure how the machine that made lightning and sparks was important to anyone outside of the science museum. When I learned that Nikola Tesla invented the radio, and not Marconi, I was shocked. Tesla also invented the electric generator, the electric motor, fluorescent lighting, alternating current (AC) and devised the technologies that generate and deliver our electrical power for our homes, schools and factories. So why didn’t I ever learn about Tesla in school — the same way I learned about Thomas Edison, Marconi and Einstein? The story about Nikola Tesla is the story […] Read More

2000: Alternating Current vs. Direct Current

All the principles of generating electricity had been worked out in the 19th Century, but by its end, these had only just begun to produce electricity on a large scale. The 20th Century has witnessed a colossal expansion of electrical power generation and distribution. The general pattern has been toward ever-larger units of production, using steam from coal- or oil-fired boilers. Economies of scale and the greater physical efficiency achieved as higher steam temperatures and pressures were attained both reinforced this tendency. U.S. experience indicates the trend: In the first decade of the century a generating unit with a capacity of 25,000 kilowatts with pressures up to 200-300 pounds per square inch at 400º-500º F (about 200º-265º C) was considered large, but by 1930 the largest unit was 208,000 kilowatts, with pressures of 1,200 pounds per square inch at a temperature of 725º F, while the amount of fuel […] Read More