2015: The 500-Million-Year-Old Dorchester Pot Should Not Exist

Contrary to popular belief, it is not uncommon for archaeologists to find old items that seem to indicate a level of technology that, according to mainstream science, should not yet exist at the point in time in which they are carbon dated to. These are called ooparts (out of place artifacts) and unfortunately, more often than not, they are thoroughly studied but then forgotten. Could this be done purposefully? Science may seem forever extensive but apparently it’s not advanced enough to answer the puzzles that ancient civilization’s inadvertently left behind. So now we come to the very interesting part: The Dorchester Pot. This pot is a an exquisite metal vessel measuring 4.5 inches in height and 6.5 inches in diameter. It displays a geometrical design in which brilliant silvers are embossed. It would take great skill and attention to create something this beautiful. However the main reason that The Dorchester […] Read More

2012: The Baghdad Battery

The Baghdad Battery, sometimes referred to as the Parthian Battery, is the common name for a number of artifacts created in Mesopotamia, in during the Iranian dynasties of the Parthian or Sassanid period (the early centuries AD), and probably discovered in 1936 in the village of Khuyut Rabbou’a, near Baghdad, Iraq. These artifacts came to wider attention in 1938 when Wilhelm König, the German director of the National Museum of Iraq, found the objects in the museum’s collections. In 1940, König published a paper speculating that they may have been galvanic cells, perhaps used for electroplating gold onto silver objects. This interpretation continues to be considered as at least a hypothetical possibility. If correct, the artifacts would predate Alessandro Volta‘s 1800 invention of the electrochemical cell by more than a millennium. Description and dating artifacts consist of terracotta jars approximately 130 mm (5 in) tall (with a one and a […] Read More