Ancient Magic In Modern Science

Paulthier, the French Indianist, may, or may not, be taxed with too much enthusiasm when saying that India appears before him as the grand and primitive focus of human thought, whose steady flame has ended by communicating itself to, and setting on fire the whole ancient world1 – yet, he is right in his statement. It is Aryan metaphysics2 that have led the mind to occult knowledge – the oldest and the mother science of all, since it contains within itself all the other sciences. And it is occultism – the synthesis of all the discoveries in nature and, chiefly, of the psychic potency within and beyond every physical atom of matter – that has been the primitive bond that has cemented into one cornerstone the foundations of all the religions of antiquity. The primitive spark has set on fire every nation, truly, and Magic underlies now every national […] Read More

Stars And Numbers

Ancient civilization saw nothing absurd in the claims of astrology, no more than many an educated and thoroughly scientific man sees in it today. Judicial astrology, by which the fate and acts of men and nations might be foreknown, [hardly] appeared, nor does it even now appear, any more unphilosophical or unscientific than does natural astrology or astronomy-by which the events of so-called brute and inanimate nature (changes of weather, &c.), might be predicted. For it was not even prophetic insight that was claimed by the votaries of that abstruse and really grand science, but simply a great proficiency in that method of procedure which allows the astrologer to foresee certain events in the life of a man by the position of the planets at the time of his birth. Once the probability, or even the simple possibility, of an occult influence exercised by the stars upon the destiny […] Read More

1536: The Aurora of the philosophers by Paracelsus

BY THEOPHRASTUS PARACELSUS. WHICH HE OTHERWISE CALLS HIS MONARCHIA.1 CHAPTER I. CONCERNING THE ORIGIN OF THE PHILOSOPHERS’ STONE. ADAM was the first inventor of arts, because he had knowledge of all things as well after the Fall as before2. Thence he predicted the world’s destruction by water. From this cause, too, it came about that his successors erected two tables of stone, on which they engraved all natural arts in hieroglyphical characters, in order that their posterity might also become acquainted with this prediction, that so it might be heeded, and provision made in the time of danger. Subsequently, Noah found one of these tables under Mount Araroth, after the Deluge. In this table were described the courses of the upper firmament and of the lower globe, and also of the planets. At length this universal knowledge was divided into several parts, and lessened in its vigour and power. […] Read More