10 Ways You Are Being Watched, Monitored And Spied On

While the intent might be up for debate, the fact that our governments and businesses appear to be watching our every move isn’t. As technology increases, seemingly more and more rapidly, more data about us is stored and shared — and most of the time, we are unaware it is being collected or how it might be used. 1. INCREASING CCTV SURVEILLANCE In 2011, there was one CCTV camera for every 32 UK citizens. By 2016, this number had increased to one for every 11, making the United Kingdom the most spied upon country in the world. Not that the UK is alone in its surveillance of citizens. Almost all countries have security cameras in place. In 2013, the BBC ran a story about the increasing numbers of CCTV cameras being installed and put into operation across the United States, where they were being hailed as crucial in apprehending […] Read More

US to slap Chinese ‘cyber-plunderers’ with economic sanctions

The US is to impose economic sanctions against Chinese companies and individuals they believe to have profited from cyber espionage against America, reports the Washington Post. The sanctions may come shortly after China’s President Xi Jinping’s visit next month. The sanctions are reportedly being prepared under an authority issued by President Barack Obama in an April executive order that allows asset freeze and block of trade interactions with perpetrators of cyber espionage. “It sends a signal to Beijing that the administration is going to start fighting back on economic espionage, and it sends a signal to the private sector that we’re on your team. It tells China, enough is enough,” a US government official told the newspaper. The US Department of State has neither confirmed nor denied that the sanctions are being planned. “I can’t say anything about the sanctions,” State Department spokesman Mark Toner said, adding that “the […] Read More

2011: The Strange Case Of Karin Catherine Waldegrave

In 2011 something strange happened on Facebook. People were made aware of the hundreds of unnerving messages that were posted by a Canadian woman named Karin Catherine Waldegrave. Her messages read like the ramblings of a deranged conspiracy theory kook, however it wasn’t what she said that unnerved many. It was the fact that she was having a conversation with her own self. Five hundred to seven hundred cryptic replies within a twelve hour period. Soon after the messages stopped and were removed. And with it went Karin’s Facebook account. Leaving behind questions and the mystery of what happened to Karin Catherine Waldegrave. According to her Facebook profile, Karin Catherine Waldegrave was born in London and studied at the University of Toronto, Canada. Earning herself a Ph.D. during her time there. According to her profile she is well traveled and speaks several different languages including  French, Estonian, Latvian, English, Russian, Gallic, […] Read More

Thousands gather in Washington for anti-NSA 'Stop Watching Us' rally

Statement from whistleblower Edward Snowden read to crowd featuring groups from left and right of political spectrum Thousands gathered by the Capitol reflection pool in Washington on Saturday to march, chant, and listen to speakers and performers as part of Stop Watching Us, a gathering to protest “mass surveillance” under NSA programs first disclosed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden. Billed by organizers as “the largest rally yet to protest mass surveillance”, Stop Watching Us was sponsored by an unusually broad coalition of left- and right-wing groups, including everything from the American Civil Liberties Union, the Green Party, Color of Change and Daily Kos to the Libertarian Party, FreedomWorks and Young Americans for Liberty. The events began outside Union Station, a few blocks away from the Capitol. Props abounded, with a model drone hoisted by one member of the crowd and a large parachute carried by others. One member of […] Read More

Edward Snowden's leaks are misguided – they risk exposing us to cyber-attacks | David Omand

Journalists are not best placed to identify security risks; we have to trust those who oversee the intelligence-gathering Is Edward Snowden a hero or a criminal guilty of the most damaging espionage? It appears he is seen as both. Some will say he is a whistleblower who has fuelled the debate around the intercept of communications in cyberspace. But it was be no surprise to those who study the subject that a powerful search tool like Prism – and buffering software – is needed to find the communications of the terrorist or criminal among the billions of others. But is revealing intelligence capabilities the way to conduct this debate, or is it gratuitously damaging? For Britain, Snowden’s public interest justification is thin since subsequent investigation has shown conclusively the British intelligence agency concerned, GCHQ, has at all times acted lawfully. I do not detect that the British public was […] Read More

NSA spied on Indian embassy and UN mission, Edward Snowden files reveal

Documents released by US whistleblower show extent and aggression of datamining exercises targeting its diplomatic ally The US National Security Agency may have accessed computers within the Indian embassy in Washington and mission at the United Nations in New York as part of a huge clandestine effort to mine electronic data held by its south Asian ally. Documents released by the US whistleblower Edward Snowden also reveal the extent and aggressive nature of other NSA datamining exercises targeting India as recently as March of this year. The latest revelations – published in the Hindu newspaper – came as Manmohan Singh, the Indian prime minister, flew to Europe on his way to the US, where he will meet President Barack Obama. The NSA operation targeting India used two datamining tools, Boundless Informant and Prism, a system allowing the agency easy access to the personal information of non-US nationals from the […] Read More

2013: Fisa court: no telecoms company has ever challenged phone records orders

Judge says requests for mass customer data have not been challenged ‘despite the mechanism for doing so’ No telecommunications company has ever challenged the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance court’s orders for bulk phone records under the Patriot Act, the court revealed on Tuesday. The secretive Fisa court’s disclosure came inside a declassification of its legal reasoning justifying the National Security Agency’s ongoing bulk collection of Americans’ phone records. Citing the “unprecedented disclosures” and the “ongoing public interest in this program”, Judge Claire V Eagan on 29 August not only approved the Obama administration’s request for the bulk collection of data from an unidentified telecommunications firm, but ordered it declassified. Eagan wrote that despite the “lower threshold” for government bulk surveillance under Section 215 of the Patriot Act compared to other laws, the telephone companies who have received Fisa court orders for mass customer data have not challenged the law. […] Read More

2013: Google's Eric Schmidt says government spying is 'the nature of our society'

Tech giant’s executive chairman calls for greater transparency but declines to ‘pass judgment’ on spying operations Eric Schmidt, the executive chairman of Google, reiterated the tech industry’s call for greater transparency from the US government over surveillance on Friday, but declined to “pass judgment” on American spying operations. Speaking in New York, at an event hosted by the New America Foundation, Schmidt said it was time for a public debate about the nature of the surveillance activities carried out by the National Security Agency (NSA). But he also said that spying was a fact of modern life. “There’s been spying for years, there’s been surveillance for years, and so forth, I’m not going to pass judgement on that, it’s the nature of our society,” he said. With the other major technology companies, Google has been pressing the US government to be more open about the surveillance orders issued by […] Read More

The Fate Of The Occultist

From the first month of my arrival in America I began, for reasons mysterious, but perhaps intelligible, to provoke hatred among those who pretended to be on good terms with me, if not the best of friends. Slanderous reports, vile insinuations and innuendoes have rained about me. For more than two years I have kept silent, although the least of the offences attributed to me were calculated to excite the loathing of a person of my disposition. I have rid myself of a number of these retailers of slander, but finding that I was actually suffering in the estimation of friends whose good opinion I valued, I adopted a policy of seclusion. For two years my world has been in my apartments, and for an average of at least seventeen hours a day I have sat at my desk, with my books and manuscripts as my companions. During this […] Read More