20 Percent of College Students Believe Beating Heads of Political Opponents is Acceptable

Twenty percent of college students believe physical violence is acceptable when you disagree with someone on politics. And 44% believe hate speech is not protected by the US Constitution. Of course, liberals define hate speech as any right of center speech they disagree with. The Brookings Institute conducted a survey of 1,500 college students around the nation, and found fully 44 percent think hate speech — whatever that is — isn’t a First Amendment right. About half that think violence is an OK form of protest. The indoctrination of the next generation is nearly complete. The left’s years and years of hard work at shutting down dissenting political views is paying off big time. What is hate speech, anyway? That’s not an American notion. Founding Fathers, after all, incorporated the First Amendment for the very reason of protecting political speech, words that irked, rhetoric that seemed more rabble-rousing than […] Read More

The Right To Download Arms: 3-D Printed Firearms Ignite Free Speech Battle

Cody Wilson works on the first completely 3D-printed handgun, The Liberator, at his home in Austin on Friday May 10, 2013. (AP Photo/Austin American Statesman, Jay Janner) AUSTIN CHRONICLE OUT, COMMUNITY IMPACT OUT, INTERNET MUST CREDIT PHOTOGRAPHER AND STATESMAN.COM AUSTIN, Texas — As legislation struggles to keep pace with technology, the Internet is the modern Wild West. For the past two years, Defense Distributed has been embroiled in a legal showdown at the intersection of the growth of the 3-D printed weapons industry and Internet free speech. “Let’s be honest, there are so many CAD [computer-aided design] websites online, people have been sharing their gun culture online for a long time,” Cody Wilson, director and co-founder of Defense Distributed, told MintPress News. “Even if there was an ATF [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives] for the Internet, a regulatory agency tasked with only policing the gun culture on […] Read More

NH Judge Says Secretly Recording Police is Legal, Dismisses Wiretapping Charge

In a six page decision issued this week, NH Hillsborough superior court judge Gillian L. Abramson dismissed the misdemeanor wiretapping charge against Alfredo Valentin – affirming the right to record police in public includes secret recordings. The judge cites both the Glik and Gericke cases which were important federal cases affirming the right to record police in public. The state argued in this case, that since the recording was secret, the right to record doesn’t apply in NH, where the wiretapping statute is ridiculously oppressive. The judge smacked that claim down: the Court finds that the First Amendment protects secretly filming police in public, for the same reasons that the First Amendment generally protects filming police. The public has the right to gather and disseminate information about the police. Free State Project early mover and attorney Brandon Ross is Valentin’s lawyer (Ross has previously beaten wiretapping charges at the […] Read More

Texas Cops Tell Protesters That Socks With Pictures of Guns Constitute ‘Trespassing’ On State Capitol

It makes little-to-no sense at all, but in Austin, Texas, cops recently told gun rights activists that merely having socks that have a picture of a gun on them is enough to charge them with “trespassing.” Murdoch Pizgatti and Jason Orsek, the founders of Come and Take It Texas, were denied access to capitol grounds by cops who threatened them with criminal trespassing charges for “carrying” mere “pictures” of guns on their hips. The pictures were printed on socks. The purpose was clearly to make a point and a statement. But that statement is covered by the First Amendment, not the Second. The police at the State Capitol had little respect for protected speech, or the socks – for that matter – which were really just a form of “protest sign. The protesters had arrived in order to testify on two gun bills, SB 11 and SB17. But as […] Read More