UK Man Accused of Hacking US Government Wins Battle to Protect Encryption

Lauri Love On Tuesday, hacktivist Lauri Love won his battle against the UK’s National Crime Agency, who was trying to force him to turn over his encryption keys. Love, 31, of Suffolk is currently wanted by the US government for allegedly hacking into agencies including the US Army, NASA, the US Federal Reserve and the Environmental Protection Agency. There are three open extradition requests against him, one to New Jersey, another to the Southern District of New York, and a last to East Virginia. First arrested in 2013 on an arrest warrant from the US Love was not charged in the UK — yet he had computer equipment seized by British police who then released him on bail. After his release, Love filed a lawsuit against the UK government to return his seized electronics (including devices which they were unable to decrypt), and in May 2015, he had most […] Read More

Hacking for Security, and Getting Paid for It

SAN FRANCISCO — It should come as no surprise that the Internet is riddled with holes. For as long as people have been writing code, they have been making mistakes. And just about as long as they have been making mistakes, criminals, governments, so-called hacktivists and people who wreck things for kicks have been taking advantage. But if 2014 was the year that hackings of everything from federal government computer networks to the computers of Sony Pictures became routine news, 2015 may be the year that companies tried to do something about it. Though not without some rough nudging. Technology companies including Google, Facebook, Dropbox, Microsoft, Yahoo, PayPal and even the electric-car maker Tesla now offer hackers bounties for reporting the flaws they find in the companies’ wares. It is a significant shift from the tech industry’s standard way of responding — or not responding — to hackers who […] Read More