2016: Sinterklaas

Sinterklaas is a mythical figure with legendary, historical and folkloric origins based on Saint Nicholas and is the primary source of the popular Christmas icon of Santa Claus. Sinterklaas is an elderly, stately and serious man with white hair and a long, full beard. He wears a long red cape or chasuble over a traditional white bishop’s alb and sometimes red stola, dons a red miter and ruby ring, and holds a gold-colored crosier, a long ceremonial shepherd’s staff with a fancy curled top, and traditionally he rides a white horse. Zwarte Piet is a companion of Sinterklaas, usually portrayed by a man in blackface with black curly hair, dressed up like a 17th-century page in colorful attire, often sporting a lace collar and a feathered cap.  Parallels have been drawn between the legend of Sinterklaas and the figure of Odin, who as King of the Norse Aesir was a major […] Read More

Mitakuye Oyasin

As a people, the Tribe of Man, we must all learn to work together. We must stop fighting and pointing fingers. We must not take more than we need. War serves no purpose other than to destroy. There comes a time when one must stop and think. Questions asked of self are good. Each of us has a purpose and we are all connected. We are all related…like it or not… And remember, what you do to another… you do to yourself. So, the next time you begin to speak or act in anger, STOP and think. Before you pick up a stone to throw, STOP and think.

Old Hindu Ships

Some twenty-five years ago two ocean steamships came into collision off the coast of Newfoundland; one sank with all on board, the other was saved in consequence of having the hull divided by iron bulkheads into water-tight compartments. Though the bottom was crushed in the water, it would only fill the compartment where the break was, and so the steamship came safely to port. This then novel improvement in the art of ship-building was brought into such conspicuous notice by that occurrence, and its merits were so palpable, that from that time steamships have been almost universally built with water-tight bulkheads. Like most other supposed “modern” inventions, this was known to the ancient Hindus; and in quoting what follows from the narrative of the famous – now respected and credited – Venetian traveller of the thirteenth century, Ser Marco Polo,1 we express the hope that this may serve as […] Read More

African Magic

By Tau-Triadelta Before we enter into the subject of the occult art as practised on the West Coast of Africa, it will be well to clear the ground by first considering for a moment what we mean by the much-abused term “Magic.” There are many definitions of this word; and, in bygone ages, it was simply used to designate anything and everything which was “not understanded of the vulgar.” It will be sufficient for our purpose to define it as the knowledge of certain natural laws which are not merely unknown but absolutely unsuspected by the scientists of Europe and America. It is a recognized fact that no law of Nature can be – even for a single moment – abrogated. When, therefore, this appears to us to be the case – when, for instance, such a universally known law as that of the attraction of gravitation seems to […] Read More

Karmic Visions

    Oh, sad no more! Oh, sweet No more!     Oh, strange No more!     By a mossed brook bank on a stone     I smelt a wild weed-flower alone;     There was a ringing in my ears,     And both my eyes gushed out with tears,     Surely all pleasant things had gone before.     Low buried fathom deep beneath with thee, NO MORE!         –TENNYSON    (“The Gem,” 1831) I     A camp filled with war-chariots, neighing horses and legions of long-haired soldiers. . . .     A regal tent, gaudy in its barbaric splendour. Its linen walls are weighed down under the burden of arms. In its centre a raised seat covered with skins, and on it a stalwart, savage-looking warrior. He passes in review prisoners of war brought in turn before him, who are disposed of according to the whim of the heartless despot.     […] Read More

The Denials and the Mistakes of the Nineteenth Century

At or near the beginning of the present century all the books called Hermetic were loudly proclaimed and set down as simply a collection of tales, of fraudulent pretences and most absurd claims, being, in the opinion of the average man of science, unworthy of serious attention. They “never existed before the Christian era,” it was said; “they were all written with the triple object of speculation, deceit and pious fraud”; they were all, the best of them, silly apocrypha. In this respect, the nineteenth century proved a most worthy progeny of the eighteenth. For in the age of Voltaire, as well as in this, everything that did not emanate direct from the Royal Academy was false, superstitious and foolish, and belief in the wisdom of the Ancients was laughed to scorn, perhaps more even than it is now. The very thought of accepting as authentic the works and […] Read More

2013: Spontaneous Human Combustion

by  Garth Haslam – Anomalies – the Strange & Unexplained  The Legend: For as yet scientifically unknown reasons, times occur when an unsuspecting person can just burst into flames and be incinerated. The flames begin within the victim’s own body and are horribly complete in their work, reducing their human fuel to a pile of ashes in minutes — sometimes seconds. The whole event is so quick and selective that objects near the victim show only minor heat damage if any at all; sometimes, even the victim’s clothes are left untouched. These inner flames have been occurring for as long as mankind has existed; but most coroners, pathologists, scientists, and fire officials ignore such evidence, blithely choosing much neater and less controversial explanations for these unexplained deaths. A Brief History Many contend that Spontaneous Human Combustion is first documented in such early texts as the Bible, but, scientifically speaking, these accounts are […] Read More