You’re being programmed into accepting a national driver’s license known as ‘Real ID’

Half a century ago people had to be reassured their social security card was not being used for identification. Now there are federally standardized and globally synchronized ID cards, government-sponsored online ID projects, DNA databases, and even secret databases of your newborn baby’s genetic information. Related articles New Study Links Vaccine Induced Overload To Autism Men In Black: The “Other” Silencers Moon Bases 6 Powerful Ways to Balance the Ego with the Soul Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act – Cooperative Federalism and Performance-Based Standards

2012: Tracking School Children With RFID Tags? It’s All About the Benjamins

BY DAVID KRAVETS 09.07.12 6:30 AM Just as the U.S. Department of Agriculture mandates Radio Frequency Identification Device chips to monitor livestock, a Texas school district just begun implanting the devices on student identification cards to monitor pupils’ movements on campus, and to track them as they come and go from school. Tagging school children with RFID chips is uncommon, but not new. A federally funded preschool in Richmond, California, began embedding RFID chips in students’ clothing in 2010. And an elementary school outside of Sacramento, California, scrubbed a plan in 2005 amid a parental uproar. And a Houston, Texas, school district began using the chips to monitor students on 13 campuses in 2004. It was only a matter of time. Radio frequency identification devices are a daily part of the electronic age, and are fast becoming a part of passports, libraries and payment cards, and are widely expected to replace bar-code labels […] Read More

Microsoft-loving (former) security czar calls for closed internet

By Cade Metz in Santa Clara Published Tuesday 2nd October 2007 22:24 GMT Richard Clarke, the man who served President Bush as a special adviser for cyber security, has a five-point plan for saving the internet. Speaking at a Santa Clara University conference dedicated to “trust online,” Clarke called the net “a place of chaos in many ways, a place of crime in many ways,” but laid out several means of righting the ship, including biometric IDs, government regulation, and an industry wide standard for secure software. He even embraces the idea of a closed internet – which seems to have sparked a death threat from net pioneer Vint Cerf. “A lot of these ideas go against the grain. A lot of these ideas are ones people have already objected to – because of certain shibboleths, because of certain belief systems, because of certain idealogical differences,” Clarke said. “But […] Read More

2008: Ex-IBM Employee Alleges TV Abandoned Analog Band to Make Room for Chips

An introduction to New Technologies by Patrick Redmond Patrick Redmond graduated with a Doctorate in History from the University of London, England in 1972. He taught at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad, then at Adhadu Bello University in Kano, Nigeria before joining IBM. He worked in IBM for 31 years before retiring. During his career at IBM he held a variety of jobs. These included; from 1992 until 2007 working at the IBM Toronto lab in technical, then in sales support. He has written two books and numerous articles. Here is a presentation he gave in Toronto on April 13, 2008. * * * I want to thank Yvon for inviting me here to talk about new technologies. What I’m going to do is give you an introduction to three technologies that are becoming more and more important. The first is RFID chips, the second genetic […] Read More