2017: Here’s How to Delete Yourself from the Internet – at the Click of a Button

In our smart phone-obsessed digital age, we effectively live our entire lives online, which makes us increasingly vulnerable to unseen threats.  Cybercrime, fraud, and identity theft are exponentially growing concerns. Our personal lives, locations, and increasingly our passwords are made public online for anyone to find. If the highly invasive Investigatory Powers Bill (AKA the Snooper’s Charter) isn’t blocked, then every single digital move you make will be recorded for up to 12 months. Also, infinite junk mails. But erasing your digital trace from the World Wide Web can seem overwhelming, especially since each person has on average 1,000,000,000 preferences, passwords, subscriptions and linked accounts. So how would you go about tracking them all down? In step two Swedish developers, with the easy-assemble, Ikea-style approach.  Wille Dahlbo and Linus Unnebäck have created Deseat.me, which allows you to log in with a Google account, and immediately see which apps and services are linked to it. […] Read More

2017: New 5G Cell Towers and Smart Meters to Increase Microwave Radiation and Invade Privacy

By John P. Thomas When the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) approved the use of 5-G microwave communication technology in 2016 and approved the use of microwave frequencies in the 30 Ghz range, [1], they opened the door to even higher levels of human illness and severe disability for American children and adults. Microwave radiation such as that currently being used in cell phones, Wi-Fi routers, and smart meters has already been linked to numerous health effects. The introduction of even more intense levels of microwave exposure at higher frequencies will push many people into a life-threatening chronic illness. High-frequency microwave radiation is often overlooked as a causative factor in illness, because most conventional healthcare providers, government regulators, telecom companies, and electric utilities believe microwave radiation used in communication technology is harmless. [2] Despite the warnings being raised by scientists, well-informed healthcare providers, and grassroots organizations about existing and future […] Read More

CISA Systemic Domestic Spying

Technology in cyber space is designed to be the instrument of a totality surveillance society. Secretive methods, back doors, observation and collection of data have been in place for decades. CISA is the latest legislation authorization agreement that provides liability exemption for law enforcement and spooks to conduct their systematic assimilation with the codes and functions of technological development for the intended purpose of efficient monitoring of electronic communication. Coercion for compliance from any resisting tech giant will provide the government with the brute force to muscle their way past any remnants of Fourth Amendment Bill of Right protections. The fact that there is so much enthusiasm in Congress to further gut civil liberties comes as no surprise but is frightening that the push back is so weak. Senate overwhelmingly passes historic cybersecurity bill is reported by CNN accordingly, “It took several tries, but on Tuesday the U.S. Senate […] Read More

2015: Internet Is Less Safe, Less Free And Less Private

(The Real Agenda) The world wide web is becoming a police state in itself where users, who have paid for its construction and dissemination, are less safe and less free to navigate. Internet freedom has declined for the fifth consecutive year, and, not surprisingly governments are the parties the bear the bulk of the responsibility for such a decrease as they are the ones imposing restrictions on the rights of Internet users and illegally monitoring their activity. These are some conclusions of the report published by Freedom House, an organisation that analyzed the current state Internet freedom in 65 countries. The study indicates that more and more governments try to censor information that is of general interest and puts pressure on the private sector to remove content they do not approve. Although some of the grossest infringements on Internet freedom are though to be committed in places like China […] Read More

2015: FBI Reveals 11 Attacks Against Internet Lines in California

On Tuesday, someone broke into an underground vault in Sacramento, and cut several high-capacity internet cables. Nobody knows who this person is or why they did it, but since that time the FBI has revealed that it was not an isolated incident. They’ve been investigating 10 other recent attacks on the internet infrastructure of California, and they seem to be deeply troubled by the vulnerability of these cables. The FBI is investigating at least 11 physical attacks on high-capacity Internet cables in California’s San Francisco Bay Area dating back a year, including one early Tuesday morning. Agents confirm the latest attack disrupted Internet service for businesses and residential customers in and around Sacramento, the state’s capital. FBI agents declined to specify how significantly the attack affected customers, citing the ongoing investigation. In Tuesday’s attack, someone broke into an underground vault and cut three fiber-optic cables belonging to Colorado-based service […] Read More

2015: Net Neutrality Fast Facts

http://ift.tt/1BBXPIu The Federal Communications Commission just approved new rules that allow it to regulate the Internet like a utility, establishing net neutrality. But only for now. The move has some very powerful opponents, starting with the cable and telecom companies  — companies that control most of the Internet infrastructure, seem likely to take the issue to court and have many friends in Congress. In recent days and weeks, the primary opposition in Congress to a move to establish net neutrality was led by Republicans, who do indeed get a lot of support from the big telecoms and cable companies — but it’s by no means a partisan issue. Many Democrats also have close ties to these companies. We’ve compiled some fast facts below on the influence wielded in Washington by the four biggest opponents of net neutrality and just who their friends are: Comcast: Comcast, the cable, Internet and […] Read More

2015: 5 Things Busy People Can Do to Fight the Rising Control System

Bernie Suarez Activist Post Want to implement small-scale, realistic tasks in your own life to strike back at the control system? Have you been seeing the daily headlines, the lies, the deceit and the global enslavement agenda in full swing and feeling that you aren’t doing enough to fight back because of your busy schedule? Feeling helpless and overwhelmed by the idea that a small group of psychopaths at the very top would push for a global order that involves their full enjoyment of life while you and the rest of humanity live as miserable slaves forever? Don’t have time to be a full-time activist, be involved in marches, or downright challenge the court system? Wondering what small things you can do to fight back as you deal with the hustle and bustle of your own life working to pay bills, obtain an education, or raising children? Here are […] Read More

Is the Internet Making Us Less Religious?

If you’re a sociologist of religion, one of the biggest stories of 2014 has been the decline in religious affiliation in the United States. Both the Pew Forum and the University of Chicago found that the number of unaffiliated Americans has more than doubled in recent years, to the point where roughly 1 in 5 Americans identifies as non-religious. There are a wide range of theories as to why this happened, the most credible—in my opinion—centering on the culturally transformative role of the American Religious Right, which has made it very difficult to be both theologically conservative and politically liberal. But there’s another interesting factor that could help explain the growth of the secular community: the Internet. The MIT Technology Review’s end-of-year feature highlights an April study that found an interesting correlation between increased Internet usage and decreased religious participation. From the article: In the 1980s, Internet use was essentially […] Read More

2014: Censoring the Web Isn’t the Solution to Terrorism or Counterfeiting. It’s the Problem.

It’s an attractive idea because if you don’t think too hard, it appears to be a political no-brainer. It allows governments to avoid addressing the underlying social problem—a long and costly process—and instead simply pass the buck to Internet providers, who can quickly make whatever content has raised rankles “go away.” Problem solved! Except, of course, that it isn’t. Amongst the difficult social problems that Web censorship is often expected to solve are terrorism, child abuse, and copyright and trademark infringement. In recent weeks some further cases of this tactic being vainly employed against such problems have emerged from the United Kingdom, France, and Australia. UK Court Orders ISPs to Block Websites for Trade Mark Infringement In a victory for luxury brands and a loss for Internet users, the British High Court last month ordered five of the country’s largest ISPs to block websites selling fake counterfeit goods. Whilst alarming enough, […] Read More