Microsoft is breaking Windows 7 to get users to upgrade to Windows 10

Microsoft has made a change to an update for Windows 7 that can prevent certain systems from booting. While you might expect me to say, “good news, the software giant has fixed the problem”, in fact what Microsoft has done is switch the update from “optional”, to “recommended”. So, on some systems, it will now install, and break Windows 7 automatically. There is good news though, and that’s you can solve the problem and get your computer working again by (can you guess?) upgrading to Windows 10. Hooray! The update in question is KB3133977 and what this does is fix a problem that stops BitLocker encrypting drives because of service crashes in svhost.exe. If that’s a problem you have, you’ll welcome the fix. Unless you have an ASUS motherboard. As Microsoft explains: After you install update 3133977 on a Windows 7 x64-based system that includes an ASUS-based main board, […] Read More

Microsoft has no plans to tell us what’s in Windows patches

Microsoft has now released three cumulative updates for Windows 10. These updates combine security fixes with non-security bug fixes, and so far, Microsoft hasn’t done a very good job of describing the contents of these cumulative updates. While the security content is quite fully described, explanations of the non-security fixes have been lacking. Many, including your author, feel that this is undesirable and that a key part of the Windows-as-a-Service concept, in which Microsoft releases a steady stream of fixes and functional improvements, is a clear explanation of what those updates are. This is a new approach for Microsoft, and it seems like reassuring users and administrators that issues are getting fixed—and that functional changes are clearly described—should be important. This is doubly important in those unfortunate situations that a patch has a problem. Microsoft will tend to update such patches when the problems have been fixed, but it […] Read More

Hello Biometrics: Windows 10 To Add Facial Recognition, Iris Scans And Fingerprint Reader (VIDEO)

By: Nicholas | Tech Swarm – After several years of consumer complaints, Microsoft Windows 10 has been getting a lot of attention as of late for many upgrades slated for their new version of the popular operating system. However, it appears that one feature being added to supposedly consumer-friendly applications is a suite of biometrics called Windows Hello and Windows Passport. It’s all a part of the move toward a full-fledged Smart World where YOU become the password in a matrix of online and real-world activity. Naturally, the fear of identity theft and cyber crime of all stripes has been the sales pitch to accept this new pervasive identity tech. Apple’s Touch ID was introduced in iPhone 5 which employed a fingerprint scanner for phone locking as well as to make purchases in Apple stores. Yet, it didn’t take long for this new ultra-security measure to be hacked. As Melissa […] Read More

2013: Google & Microsoft Hire Hackers To Identify Software Vulnerabilities

By Susanne Posel Occupy Corporatism Thanks to HackerOne , rewards will be given to hackers who can identify software vulnerabilities for programmers to overcome. Microsoft and Google have come together to fund this project. These “bug bounties” will not be tied to a specific technology. Criteria for a bounty exposing cheese holes in software include the widespread and severity of the compromise. First a hacker must crack Chrome, Internet Explorer 10 EPM, Adobe Reader, and Adobe Flash. Programs of interest include: • PHP • Open SSL • Ruby • Apache Google’s bounty program has been running for several years and paid out an estimated $2 million to hackers under the Chromium and Google Web Vulnerability Reward Programs (CGW-VRP). Microsoft has their own bounty program that has poured out $128,000 to hackers for uncovering issues with Windows 8.1. Facebook has invested $1.5 million for research into bounties and have hired full-time employees to ensure bugs are exposed and security […] Read More

2013: WE EXPOSED THE PRIVATE DETAILS OF 6 MILLION USERS – FACEBOOK

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Facebook Inc has inadvertently exposed 6 million users’ phone numbers and email addresses to unauthorized viewers over the past year, the world’s largest social networking company disclosed late Friday. Facebook blamed the data leaks, which began in 2012, on a technical glitch in its massive archive of contact information collected from its 1.1 billion users worldwide. As a result of the glitch, Facebook users who downloaded contact data for their list of friends obtained additional information that they were not supposed to have. Facebook’s security team was alerted to the bug last week and fixed it within 24 hours. But Facebook did not publicly acknowledge the bug until Friday afternoon when it published an “important message” on its blog explaining the issue. A Facebook spokesman said the delay was due to company procedure stipulating that regulators and affected users be notified before making a public […] Read More

2007: Microsoft-loving (former) security czar calls for closed internet

By Cade Metz in Santa Clara Published Tuesday 2nd October 2007 22:24 GMT Richard Clarke, the man who served President Bush as a special adviser for cybersecurity, has a five-point plan for saving the internet. Speaking at a Santa Clara University conference dedicated to “trust online,” Clarke called the net “a place of chaos in many ways, a place of crime in many ways,” but laid out several means of righting the ship, including biometric IDs, government regulation, and an industry-wide standard for secure software. He even embraces the idea of a closed internet – which seems to have sparked a death threat from net pioneer Vint Cerf. “A lot of these ideas go against the grain. A lot of these ideas are ones people have already objected to – because of certain shibboleths, because of certain belief systems, because of certain ideological differences,” Clarke said. “But if we’re […] Read More