Oliver Stone lashes out at Pokemon Go

Director Oliver Stone used a presentation of his upcoming film about Edward Snowden as an opportunity to speak out against the augmented-reality mobile game Pokemon Go, which has been downloaded more than 30 million times in a fortnight. “It’s not really funny. What’s happening is a new level of invasion,” said the 69-year-old director at Comic Con in San Diego, referring to the app, which requires players to physically walk to different places to capture the precious Pokemon. According to Stone, while users are playing an innocent game, digital companies are collecting invaluable personal data. “The profits are enormous here for places like Google. They’ve invested a huge amount of money in data mining – what you are buying, what you like, your behavior,” said Stone, whose film, titled Snowden, comes out in September. “It’s what some people call surveillance capitalism,” said Stone, who is famous for his films […] Read More

2013: Oliver Stone on 50th Anniversary of JFK Assassination & the Untold History of the United States

Stone argues how the official version of JFK‘s death could not possibly have happened. Three-time Academy Award-winning director, producer and screenwriter Oliver Stone joins us for the hour to discuss the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination on November 22, which was chronicled in his blockbuster film, “JFK.” A Vietnam War veteran, Stone has made around two dozen acclaimed Hollywood films, including “Platoon,” “Salvador,” “Born on the Fourth of July,” “Nixon,” “South of the Border” and “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps.” A commemorative edition of “JFK” comes out next week. Most recently, Stone has co-written the 10-part Showtime series, “Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States,” and companion book with the same name, co-written by Peter Kuznick, professor of history and director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University. AMY GOODMAN: This month marks the 50th anniversary of an assassination that continues to haunt the nation. On […] Read More

The Spiritual Truth of JFK

this article examines the assassination within the wider context of the mass psychological perspective of the time period. peter gabel touches upon something here that is rarely if ever explored in such a perceptive and far-reaching way. one of the most provocative analyses i have seen. . . . It was this feeling–“the rise of a new generation of Americans“–that more than any ideology threatened the system of cultural and erotic control that dominated the fifties and that still dominated the governmental elites of the early sixties–the FBI, the CIA, even elements of Kennedy’s own cabinet and staff. Kennedy’s evocative power spoke to people’s longing for some transcendent community and in so doing, it allowed people to make themselves vulnerable enough to experience both hope and, indirectly, the legacy of pain and isolation that had been essentially sealed from public awareness since the end of the New Deal. . […] Read More