1892: Old Philosophers and Modern Critics

In one of the oldest philosophies and religious systems of prehistoric times, we read that at the end of a Mahâ-Pralaya (general dissolution) the great Soul, Param-Atmâ the Self-Existent, that which can be “apprehended only by the suprasensual,” becomes “manifest of itself.”1 The Hindûs give this “Existence” various names, one of which is Svayambhû, or Self-Existent. This Svayambhû emanates from itself the creative faculty, or Svâyambhuva – the “Son of the Self-Existent” – and the One becomes Two; this in its turn evolves a third principle with the potentiality of becoming Matter which the orthodox call Virâj, or the Universe.2 This incomprehensible Trinity became later anthropomorphized into the Trimûrti, known as Brahmâ, Vishnu, Shiva, the symbols of the creative, the preservative, and the destructive powers in Nature – and at the same time of the transforming or regenerating forces, or rather of the three aspects of the one Universal […] Read More

1885: Spiritual Progress

Christina Rossetti‘s well-known lines: Does the road wind up-hill all the way? Yes, to the very end. Does the journey take the whole long day? From morn to night, my friend. are like an epitome of the life of those who are truly treading the path which leads to higher things. Whatever differences are to be found in the various presentations of the Esoteric Doctrine, as in every age it donned a fresh garment, different both in hue and texture to that which preceded; yet in every one of them we find the fullest agreement upon one point – the road to spiritual development. One only inflexible rule has been ever binding upon the neophyte, as it is binding now – the complete subjugation of the lower nature by the higher. From the Vedas and Upanishads to the recently published Light on the Path, search as we may through […] Read More

1878: The Ahkoond of Swat

– The Founder Of Many Mystical Societies. Of the many remarkable characters of this century, Ghafur was one of the most conspicuous. If there be truth in the Eastern doctrine that souls, powerful whether for good or bad, who had not time in one existence to work out their plans, are reïncarnated, the fierceness of their yearnings to continue on earth thrusting them back into the current of their attractions, then Ghafur was a rebirth of that Felice Peretti, who is known in history as Pope Sixtus V., of crafty and odious memory. Both were born in the lowest class of society, being ignorant peasant boys and beginning life as herdsmen. Both reached the apex of power through craft and stealth and by imposing upon the superstitions of the masses. Sixtus, author of mystical books and himself a practitioner of the forbidden sciences to satisfy his lust for power […] Read More

1990: The Influence of Vedic Philosophy on Teslas understanding of Free Energy

By Toby Grotz “The first thing to realize about the ether is its absolute continuity. A deep-sea fish has probably no means of apprehending the existence of water; it is too uniformly immersed in it: and that is our condition in regard to the ether.” – Sir Oliver Lodge, Ether and Reality.   Abstract Nikola Tesla used ancient Sanskrit terminology in his descriptions of natural phenomena. As early as 1891 Tesla described the universe as a kinetic system filled with energy which could be harnessed at any location. His concepts during the following years were greatly influenced by the teachings of Swami Vivekananda. Swami Vivekananda was the first of a succession of eastern yogi’s who brought Vedic philosophy and religion to the west. After meeting the Swami and after continued study of the Eastern view of the mechanisms driving the material world, Tesla began using the Sanskrit words Akasha, […] Read More

2012: Rakshasha Influence: Make The Connection

So often nowadays, we experience how Western-oriented Hindus, specifically the scientific community and academic community, criticize traditional Vedic dharma in the name of secularism and progress. Westernized Hindus espouse not only Western intellectual thought, but they are popular Western culture as well; this is especially true since the insertion of radio into even small, countryside villages and since the advent of television. It seems as if an element of India’s own population is undermining its own culture from within, almost as if it were some kind of fifth column against its own, dharmic culture. On the surface, this tendency seems simply to be brought about by the onslaught of foreign culture as history has recorded it; first by the Muslim invasions, later by the British, and now by globalization and telecommunication. But if we scratch the surface a little, we might find a deeper, more remote cause. A nice […] Read More