2015: Unusual Facts About the World’s Richest People

An idiosyncrasy is an unusual feature of a person, which also means odd habit. This term is often used to express eccentricity or peculiarity, a synonym may be known also as quirk. Quirk is an idiosyncrasy, a slight glitch, mannerism or something unusual about the manner of someone’s style or style of something. 1)   Bill Gates Bill Gates is best known as a billionaire, Philanthropist and the founder of Microsoft world’s largest software company. a college dropout, and enrolled in 1973 at Harvard College in the autumn. Gates was arrested in New Mexico in 1977, for allegedly beating a red light and driving without a license. In 1985, Bill Gates was named one of  of 50 Most Eligible Bachelors by Good Housekeeping. On January 1, 1994, Gates married Melinda French and together, they have three children, two daughters Jennifer Katharine (born 1996) and Phoebe Adele (born 2002), and son Rory John (born 1999). The Gates family lived in an earth-sheltered house in the side of a […] Read More

2014: This Is What Employment In America Really Looks Like…

The level of employment in the United States has been declining since the year 2000.  There have been moments when things have appeared to have been getting better for a short period of time, and then the decline has resumed.  Thanks to the offshoring of millions of jobs, the replacement of millions of workers with technology and the overall weakness of the U.S. economy, the percentage of Americans that are actually working is significantly lower than it was when this century began.  And even though things have stabilized at a reduced level over the past few years, it is only a matter of time until the next major wave of the economic collapse strikes and the employment level goes even lower.  And the truth is that more good jobs are being lost every single day in America.  For example, as you will read about below, Warren Buffett is shutting […] Read More

2014: Former Central Banker Admits “[They] Are Making It Up As They Go Along”

Submitted by Tim Price via Sovereign Man blog, A few weeks ago, William White (former economist at the Bank of England, the Bank of Canada, and Bank of International Settlements) made a frank admission. And while we search for assets whose prices are less obviously distorted by malign government intervention, it’s refreshing to hear a mea culpa from a member of the economics “profession”. White said: “The analytical underpinnings of what we [mainstream economists] do are actually pretty shaky. A reflection of that fact, is that virtually every aspect you can think of with respect to monetary policy, about best practice, has changed and changed repetitively over the course of the last 50 years. So, this stuff ain’t science. “Think about what’s happened recently. One, its completely unprecedented. People are making it up as they go along. This is hardly science – building on the pillars of the past. […] Read More

2013: How Ayn Rand’s Idiotic Worldview Makes the Wealthy Feel Good About Themselves

Sorry, but making a profit off something that’s useless to society is not morally superior to helping others. For those who haven’t had the great misfortune of reading “Atlas Shrugged,” the book is premised on the idea that if the world’s “creative leaders,” businessmen, innovators, artists (i.e., the “makers”) went on strike, our entire society would collapse. These strikers hide out in a utopian compound in the mountains of Colorado while the rest of us despondently wail and gnash our teeth and beg for them to once again bestow their creativity upon us. The book mirrors in many ways the more lefty “Elysium,” where to escape the environmental degradation they have wrought, the wealthiest go off to form their own society in the sky. The rest of the human population remains mired in slum-like conditions, because the only thing standing between humanity and savagery is Bill Gates. But have […] Read More

2009: Looking Back on the Greatest Depression

Gerald Celente Daily Reckoning May 7, 2009 On average, world trade fell 31 percent in January 2009. To varying degrees, recession and depression gripped globally. “The outlook for global consumption remains bleak. Exports are likely to remain lackluster until global consumers regain their appetite for consumption,” wrote Jing Ulrich, managing director at JPMorgan in Hong Kong, in response to the dire data. To track and make practical use of trends requires critical analysis of not only the data but also of the interpretations arising from the data. This becomes particularly essential when interpretations express a virtual media consensus. “Whenever you find that you are on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect,” advised Mark Twain. A case in point: On the surface, Ms. Ulrich’s assessment above does not seem unreasonable. It is a theme expressed, with minor variations, by a majority of economic analysts […] Read More