Green Snow In Russia And Snow In The Arabian Desert

Winter isn’t even here yet, but already some frosty – and strange – weather activity is appearing worldwide. First, an anomalous snow storm appeared in the Saudi Arabian desert, coating the usually hot, arid desert in a fine coating of white powder. The snow fell as temperatures plunged below zero during the last weeks of November across central and northwestern Saudi Arabia, where temperatures usually hover around 20° C (68° F) this time of year.  Snow in the desert. Local citizens were shocked and delighted by the anomaly, taking to the streets (and social media) to frolic in the rare wintry treat. Saudi Arabia has been experiencing several weather anomalies recently, including a rare desert flood. Many Saudis took to Twitter to declare “how European” the snow made them feel. A little farther to the east, a bizarre winter sight greeted residents in the historic Ural Mountain town of […] Read More

Unexplained Spiral Vortex Appears on Mexican Weather Radar

Weather radar pictures have emerged of what appears to be a huge spiral vortex covering the entire country of Mexico on December 26th. Could it be a ghost of some hurricane past or worse – a ghostly prediction of a hurricane future? Is it related to other strange spirals seen on radar displays around the world? The video posted on the Internet shows a series of radar images of the spiral. It reportedly began on December 26th and was still there as of this writing on December 31st. It strangely appears only on National Weather Service radar centered in Mexico City (named Catedral for the Metropolitan Cathedral – Catedral Metropolitana). If it’s a malfunction, there’s no mention of it on the display nor anywhere else. Could it be something else? This isn’t the first time a mysterious spiral has appeared on Mexican weather radar. This spiral was seen on […] Read More

Mysterious Orange Snow Falls on Russian Town

I survive winters by abiding by these three simple rules: enjoy the white snow, drive carefully in the grey snow and don’t eat the yellow snow. I don’t know what to do if orange snow falls and neither did the residents of the Russian city of Saratov when it was blanketed this week with a deep covering of orange flakes. Saratov is a major port (population over 800,000) on the Volga River, 858 km (533 miles) from Moscow, and has a moderate (for Russia) climate with an annual snowfall of about 163 centimeters (64 inches) which, until now, has never been orange. The orange snow was widespread and of various shades of orange along with patches of yellow and brown. Saratov’s residents were rightly skeptical to avoid eating snowflakes or jumping in the juice-colored banks until finding out what caused it. The most likely reason, according to Saratov weather […] Read More