Remember The Massacre At Wounded Knee

by Peter Cole written for Jacobinmag. On this day in 1890, the US Army murdered as many as 300 Native American men, women, and children. As dawn appeared on December 29, 1890, about 350 Lakota Indians awoke, having been forced by the US Army to camp the night before alongside the Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. The US Cavalry’s 7th Regiment had “escorted” them there the day prior and, now, surrounded the Indians with the intent to arrest Chief Big Foot (also called Spotted Elk) and disarm the warriors. When a disagreement erupted, army soldiers opened fire, including with Hotchkiss machine guns. Within minutes, hundreds of children, men, and women were shot down. Perhaps as many as three hundred killed and scores wounded that morning. Few Americans now know that the deadliest shootings in US history were massacres of native peoples. Today is the anniversary of the largest such massacre. […] Read More

2008: Wounded Knee Massacre

Never Forget December 29, 2008 marks 118 years since the massacre at Wounded There were many many many massacres in the history of Indigenous people of what is now the Americas. And we should take time to remember them, no matter your nation. So take some time today to remember the people who died at Wounded Knee and many others. A little history about Wounded Knee By TIM GIAGO (NANWICA KCIJI) Special to McClatchy Tribune While Americans agonize over the contents of the Iraq Study Group report and weigh the options of extricating U.S. soldiers from the middle of a civil war, the people of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota will gather on a lonely hill overlooking the demolished village of Wounded Knee — destroyed during the occupation of the American Indian Movement in 1973 and never rebuilt — to commemorate and grieve the massacre of their […] Read More