Authorized by Congress in 1833, construction was not begun until 1848. Architect Robert Mills was hired by the privately funded Washington National Monument Society to design a great column with a colonnade at its base. It was intended that the colonnade would have heroic statues of Washington and other revolutionary heroes and founding fathers. Financial considerations forced the abandonment of the colonnade and statues.

In 1854, members of the controversial Know-Nothing Party gained control of the Washington National Monument Society. Private contributions, which had only been trickling in, came to a halt during the Know-Nothing period, effectively forcing construction to halt for almost 25 years.

In 1876, frustrated that the nation’s tribute to George Washington was still incomplete during the Centennial year, the Grant administration got the Society to donate the project to the people of the United States, allowing Congress to appropriate public funding for the Monument’s completion. Construction was resumed in 1878 under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The exterior of the obelisk was completed in 1884. It was dedicated in 1885 by President Chester A. Arthur and opened to the public in 1888. Stewardship of the Monument was transferred to the National Park Service in 1933.

The Washington Monument is 555 feet tall. It has 897 steps which are now closed to the public except for ranger-led tours. An elevator takes visitors on the 70 second trip up to the 500 foot landing for magnificent views of the city. A bronze replica of the Jean Antoine Houdon statue of George Washington adorns the waiting room. The stairwell walls contain 192 memorial stones honoring Washington, all donated as gifts of the 50 states, and foreign governments, organizations, cities, and individuals.

THE MEMORIAL STONES Memorial stones are embedded in the granite walls of the stairway of the Washington Monument. The stones serve as individual tributes to George Washington’s leadership and are as diverse as their 192 donors. The donors were all 50 states (some of which were territories at the time the stones were donated), various municipalities, private companies and organizations, the Cherokee Nation, individual citizens, and various foreign governments.

The first to be installed was the Alabama stone in 1849. The Alaska stone, made of solid jade, was the last to be installed, in 1982. The most famous stone was a gift from Pope Pius IX–a marble slab that had been part of the Temple of Concord in Rome. On the night of March 6, 1854, a band of masked thieves stole the stone from a storage shed. Later, participants identified the thieves as members of the American, or “Know-Nothing” Party, a party which was both anti- foreigner and anti-Catholic. The “Pope’s Stone” was stolen and believed to be destroyed. In 1982, the Vatican donated a replacement stone which is a replica of the original.

In 1976, the National Park Service was forced to close the stairway to unescorted visitors primarily because of vandalism to the stones. Visitors can see the stones on ranger-led tours down the 897 steps.

Masonic Stones of the Washington Monument

The cornerstone of the Washington Monument consisted of a block of Maryland marble weighing “twenty-four thousand five hundred pounds” and was presented to the Washington National Monument Society in 1848 by Thomas Symington from his quarry about eleven miles from Baltimore. The stone was shipped to Washington from Baltimore on the B&O railroad. Upon its arrival into the city of Washington, the stone was drawn to the site of the Monument by a large body of workmen from the Washington Navy Yard, assisted by other citizens.

On the 4th of July, 1848, under a clear sky in the presence of the President of the United States and virtually every notable of the government including former first lady Dolley Madison, the cornerstone was set with masonic ceremonies by the Grand Lodge of Masons of the District of Columbia. One of the principal addresses of the occasion was given by Benjamin B. French, Grand Master, who wore the masonic apron that Washington wore at the laying of the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol. In his address French referred to the masonic master’s chair used by Washington as Worshipful Master of Washington-Alexandria Lodge, and the gavel used by the first President to set the cornerstone of the Capitol, in the custody of Potomac Lodge #5 of Georgetown, D.C. Both of these were on display for the occasion along with other Washington masonic relics.

The Washington National Monument Society, in charge of fund raising of the Monument, sensed the importance of Washington’s masonic membership and the great pride that masons felt across the country for their brother, Washington, the father of our country. The Society in 1851 and 1853 solicited members of the Masonic Order nationally through the Grand Lodges, to make contributions to the construction of the monument.

The Society in an effort to publicize the monument fund raising campaign solicited each state and territory to present a carved memorial stone to be placed in the interior of the monument walls. Stones began arriving from across the country in marble, granite and sandstone. Although the Society specified that the memorial stones be four feet long, 2 feet high, and 12 to 18 inches thick, the began arriving in all sizes, and all were placed within the Monument. By 1855 the Society had installed 92 carved commemorative stones within the walls of the Monument.

The Society solicited the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Sons of Temperance and other fraternal orders as well. This action resulted in the contributions 22 masonic memorial stones, contributed by 14 Grand Lodges and 8 individual lodges.*

The first Masonic stone ascending the Monument is that of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia at the 50 foot landing. This earliest Masonic contribution was no doubt tied into the cornerstone laying ceremony where the Grand Lodge of D.C. presided. Next to it is the stone of Naval Lodge #4 of the District of Columbia. Founded among workers at the Washington Navy Yard, Naval Lodge members doubtless participated in dragging the cornerstone to the Monument site and in the cornerstone ceremony. Both stones are marble.

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OTHER MASONIC SYMBOLS

The Washington monuments are full of masonic symbolism. If you look at a laid out map of the area, you will see a owl formed there, the owl is one of the sacred symbols of the masonic temples

By 1854, the Washington National Monument Society had exhausted its funds and all work stopped at the 150 foot level. Turmoil within the Society, bad economic times, and the fury of the coming Civil War and its aftermath would halt monument construction for 22 years. There is still a discernible line between courses of differing stonework indicating the resumption of Monument construction funded now by Congress on August 2, 1876, and spurred on by the centennial celebration of the Declaration of Independence. The Army Corps of Engineers carried on construction of the monument until its completion in 1885.

Whether or not Society Secretary John Carrol Brent was moved by the letter from the Lodge in Roxbury, Massachusetts, he began to again send another solicitations to Masonic bodies and other fraternal orders. Between July and September 1874 over two hundred pledges were received by the Society from every part of the country, chiefly from the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Red Men, and other fraternal bodies. On April 15, 1875, 211 Masonic lodges across the country responded to Brent’s call including four grand Lodges of Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and Massachusetts, the last three named Grand Lodges giving $1000 each. The average lodge gave 10,20 to 50 dollars. Mithras Lodges of Perfection, A.A.S.R, Washington D.C. made a contribution as did 24 Royal Arch Chapters and 5 commandaries. The Odd Fellows had a equal number of participating lodges, and gave many Odd Fellow memorial stones.

The aluminum metal apex, representing a small pyramid, 5.6 inches on each base side and 8.9 inches high was set December 6, 1884 on top of the 3300 pound capstone. The apex was engraved with the names of the engineers and notables who completed the monument and on one side contained the words: LAUS DEO.

The dedication was held in cold winter on February 21, 1885. Again the Grand Lodge of Masons of the District of Columbia participated using an adaptation of the cornerstone ceremony they had used in 1848. Grand Master Myron M. Parker gave an oration, and again the Washington masonic relics were displayed and Washington’s Masonic career was discussed. Naval Lodge #4, my own lodge was present, as it had been at the laying of the cornerstone thirty seven years before.

* These stones today

Masonic Stones of the Washington Monument

The cornerstone of the Washington Monument consisted of a block of Maryland marble weighing “twenty-four thousand five hundred pounds” and was presented to the Washington National Monument Society in 1848 by Thomas Symington from his quarry about eleven miles from Baltimore. The stone was shipped to Washington from Baltimore on the B&O railroad. Upon its arrival into the city of Washington, the stone was drawn to the site of the Monument by a large body of workmen from the Washington Navy Yard, assisted by other citizens.

On the 4th of July, 1848, under a clear sky in the presence of the President of the United States and virtually every notable of the government including former first lady Dolley Madison, the cornerstone was set with masonic ceremonies by the Grand Lodge of Masons of the District of Columbia. One of the principle addresses of the occasion was given by Benjamin B. French, Grand Master, who wore the masonic apron that Washington wore at the laying of the cornerstone of the U.S. Capitol. In his address French referred to the masonic master’s chair used by Washington as Worshipful Master of Washington-Alexandria Lodge, and the gavel used by the first President to set the cornerstone of the Capitol, in the custody of Potomac Lodge #5 of Georgetown, D.C. Both of these were on display for the occasion along with other Washington masonic relics.

The Washington National Monument Society, in charge of fund raising of the Monument, sensed the importance of Washington’s masonic membership and the great pride that masons felt across the country for their brother, Washington, the father of our country. The Society in 1851 and 1853 solicited members of the Masonic Order nationally through the Grand Lodges, to make contributions to the construction of the monument.

The Society in an effort to publicize the monument fund raising campaign solicited each state and territory to present a carved memorial stone to be placed in the interior of the monument walls. Stones began arriving from across the country in marble, granite and sandstone. Although the Society specified that the memorial stones be four feet long, 2 feet high, and 12 to 18 inches thick, the began arriving in all sizes, and all were placed within the Monument. By 1855 the Society had installed 92 carved commemorative stones within the walls of the Monument.

The Society solicited the Masons, the Odd Fellows, the Sons of Temperance and other fraternal orders as well. This action resulted in the contributions 22 masonic memorial stones, contributed by 14 Grand Lodges and 8 individual lodges.*

The first Masonic stone ascending the Monument is that of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia at the 50 foot landing. This earliest Masonic contribution was no doubt tied into the cornerstone laying ceremony where the Grand Lodge of D.C. presided. Next to it is the stone of Naval Lodge #4 of the District of Columbia. Founded among workers at the Washington Navy Yard, Naval Lodge members doubtless participated in dragging the cornerstone to the Monument site and in the cornerstone ceremony. Both stones are marble.

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By 1854, the Washington National Monument Society had exhausted its funds and all work stopped at the 150 foot level. Turmoil within the Society, bad economic times, and the fury of the coming Civil War and its aftermath would halt monument construction for 22 years. There is still a discernible line between courses of differing stonework indicating the resumption of Monument construction funded now by Congress on August 2, 1876, and spurred on by the centennial celebration of the Declaration of Independence. The Army Corps of Engineers carried on construction of the monument until its completion in 1885.

Whether or not Society Secretary John Carrol Brent was moved by the letter from the Lodge in Roxbury, Massachusetts, he began to again send another solicitations to Masonic bodies and other fraternal orders. Between July and September 1874 over two hundred pledges were received by the Society from every part of the country, chiefly from the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Red Men, and other fraternal bodies. On April 15, 1875, 211 Masonic lodges across the country responded to Brent’s call including four grand Lodges of Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and Massachusetts, the last three named Grand Lodges giving $1000 each. The average lodge gave 10,20 to 50 dollars. Mithras Lodges of Perfection, A.A.S.R, Washington D.C. made a contribution as did 24 Royal Arch Chapters and 5 commandaries. The Odd Fellows had a equal number of participating lodges, and gave many Odd Fellow memorial stones.

The aluminum metal apex, representing a small pyramid, 5.6 inches on each base side and 8.9 inches high was set December 6, 1884 on top of the 3300 pound capstone. The apex was engraved with the names of the engineers and notables who completed the monument and on one side contained the words: LAUS DEO.

The dedication was held in cold winter on February 21, 1885. Again the Grand Lodge of Masons of the District of Columbia participated using an adaptation of the cornerstone ceremony they had used in 1848. Grand Master Myron M. Parker gave an oration, and again the Washington masonic relics were displayed and Washington’s Masonic career was discussed. Naval Lodge #4, my own lodge was present, as it had been at the laying of the cornerstone thirty seven years before.

* These stones today

Here are the numbers for The Washington Monument (from M.L. Morton, based on the Munck system) …

Grid Longitude 108 (deg) x 10 (min) x 7.441506403 (sec) W.Giza = 8036.826915 W.Giza

= 1080 x Sarsen Circle (Stonehenge) Area in Square Feet / 1000

Note … 1080 is the radius of the Moon in statute miles.

Grid Latitude 38 (deg) x 53 (min) x 21.59494661 (sec) North = 43492.22248 North

= (14.4 x Pi) x (Pi Cubed) x (Pi Cubed)

Grid Point Value 43492.22248 / 8036.826915 = 5.411616169

— Michael L.M.

(c) 1998

*********************

From page 6, “Cosmic Patriot Files” (Abelard Productions, Inc.):

…take a good street map of the Washington DC area and its immediate surroundings. You can see in it many MAJOR masonic symbols in the street layout: The Square, the Compass, the Rule and the Pentagram. Notice the Capitol. Facing the Capitol from the Mall and using the Capitol as the head or top of the Compass, the left leg of the Compass stands on the White House and the right leg stands on the Jefferson Memorial. The circle drive and short streets behind the Capitol form the head and ears of what some of the more deep-level practitioners of witchcraft call the Goat of Mendez or Goat’s Head.

On top of the White House is an inverted 5-pointed star, or PENTAGRAM. The point is facing south in true occult fashion. It sits within the intersections of Connecticut and Vermont Avenues north of Dupont and Logan Circles, with Rhode Island and Massachusetts Avenues going to Washington Circle to the west and Mt. Vernon Square on the East. (see: FREEMASONRY: [censored]’S DOOR TO AMERICA? by J. Edward Decker, c/o FREE THE MASONS MINISTIES, P.O. BOX 1077, ISSAQUAH, WA 98027).

The center of the pentagram is 16th Street where THIRTEEN blocks due north of the very center of the White House, the Masonic HOUSE OF THE TEMPLE* sits at the top of this occult iceberg. The “House Of The Temple” is the headquarters of the Council of the 33rd degree of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry. Within the walls of this pagan temple lies buried the corpse of Albert Pike, the former Grand Pontiff of all the lodges of Universal Freemasonry throughout the world (see: THE DEADLY DECEPTION, by James Shaw – former 33rd degree Mason and Past Master of all Scottish Rite bodies – P.O. Box 884, Silver Springs, FL 32688).

The Washington Monument, which happens to be an EXACT DUPLICATE of the “sun images” or alters of Baal which stood in ancient Babylon and Egypt, itself stands in perfect line to the intersecting point or the form of the masonic square, stretching from the House Of The Temple to the Capitol building. Actual “alters” of this type have been transported at great expense and energy from Egypt to other parts of the globe, including London, Paris, New York, and several of the Babylonian alters were even transported to Rome!

[end excerpt]

_____________________________________________________

*Gematrian notes:

 

HOUSE OF THE TEMPLE=193, 1+9+3=13

THE WHITE HOUSE=166=13

THIRTEEN=99=18=9

NINE=42 (6)

42+9=51 (6)

51+9=60 (6)

42×3=126 (ONE TWENTY SIX=193=13)

ONE+TWO+SIX = 144

NINE IS THE KEY = 144

144+13=157=13

13×2=26 (number of letters in Roman/English alphabet)

ROMAN ALPHABET=126 (ONE TWENTY SIX=193=13)

ENGLISH ALPHABET= 139=13

126+139=265=13

by Gary Val Tenua

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